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How We End Up Managing Other People's Relationships

When We Focus On Other People

When We Focus On Other People

More often than not, we are trying to correct or direct things in other people’s relationships.

By focussing on other people’s associations, we end up directing how other people should behave, while being blind towards our own functioning in the relationship system.

Example: We try to manage how our parents relate to each other, or how our partner relates to our child.

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How We End Up Managing Other People's Relationships

How We End Up Managing Other People's Relationships

https://www.psychologytoday.com/intl/blog/everything-isnt-terrible/202008/how-we-end-managing-other-peoples-relationships

psychologytoday.com

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Key Ideas

When We Focus On Other People

More often than not, we are trying to correct or direct things in other people’s relationships.

By focussing on other people’s associations, we end up directing how other people should behave, while being blind towards our own functioning in the relationship system.

Example: We try to manage how our parents relate to each other, or how our partner relates to our child.

Directing Yourself

Instead of giving ready-made advice (which often sounds curt) to others on how they should manage a relationship, it is a better idea to direct yourself in your relationships, and lead by example.

When you become a better parent, partner, son or daughter, and focus on mending your own relationship with those around you, the positive effect starts to happen. The action of self-direction (towards improving yourself in the matters of relationships) is more potent than your lectures on your loved ones.

Strengthening Your Relations

When you put your energies back towards what you can control, that is You, everyone benefits. We end up relating more openly with others and share our thoughts in a healthy manner, rather than giving unwanted advice.

We are only responsible for our own maturity.

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