Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences - Deepstash

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How Different Psychologists Have Evaluated Intelligence

Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences

  • Bodily-kinesthetic intelligence: the capacity to control your body and handle objects skillfully.
  • Interpersonal intelligence: the capacity to find and respond in the right way to the moods, motivations, and desires of other people.
  • Intrapersonal intelligence: the capacity to be self-aware and aligned with your inner feelings, values, beliefs, and thinking processes.
  • Logical-mathematical intelligence: the capacity think conceptually and abstractly, and the capacity to discern logically or numerical patterns.
  • Musical intelligence: the capacity to produce and appreciate rhythm, pitch, and timbre.
  • Naturalistic intelligence: the capacity to know and categorize animals, plants, and other objects in nature.
  • Verbal-linguistic intelligence: the capaity to have developed verbal skills and sensitivity to the sounds, meanings, and rhythms of words.
  • Visual-spatial intelligence: the capacity to think in images and pictures, to visualize accurately and abstractly.

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