The popularity of the Rubik cube - Deepstash

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A Brief History of the Rubik’s Cube

The popularity of the Rubik cube

After Rubik invented the Cube, he had to try and solve it. He had no idea if his Cube could be solved, let alone how fast. It took him one month to fix it.

Today, kids are mastering an analog tool using YouTube tutorials, articles, and creating online communities. The Cube's popularity may be because of the nearly limitless number of possible solutions.

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