A Purpose Worth Fighting For

It is not enough for organizations to just have shared values and goals. There needs to be a passion that drives team performance. In the great teams that we have looked up to - those that produce value and contribute marvelous changes to society - would say that they have a purpose worth fighting for.

Having this passion allows the team members to gain a strong sense of identity within the group and hold their values firmer than the rest.

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Psychological safety is when a group is able to freely share their ideas without the fear of being criticized and being their natural selves.

Organizations that have psychological safety are more likely able to: profoundly contribute uncommon and remarkable ideas, admit to mistakes made and take responsibility, and are forward-looking towards growth and improvement.

Intellectual Diversity

One of the things that make up a great organization is one that consists of a handful variety of capable intellectuals.

People who have differing perspectives in a group are more likely to generate unique and sometimes, unusual ideas due to their differences in the environment they grew up in - ranging from their education to life experiences.

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RELATED IDEAS

Culture Hierarchy of Needs
  1. Tools for the job
  2. Organizational clarity
  3. Psychological Safety
  4. Connection
  5. Personal Fulfilment
Argument against remote work

The argument is that while remote employees may be more personally productive, the team creativity and innovation suffer. People really need spontaneous interactions at the water cooler or break room or at happy hours to foster serendipity that drives innovation.

People who support the Office-Serendipity Theory of Innovation like to cite Jobs' views to support the idea that "most people should work in an office." But the theory suffers from anecdotal evidence of chance office encounters.

Measuring Employee Productivity

Fixing employee productivity in the industrial age, when most workers were handling machinery and it’s parts, was a tedious but doable process. The managers had to fix the people who were making mistakes or were inefficient through systematic management.

Today, in the age of software and intellectual property, when half of the workforce is made up of knowledge workers, the old practices are of no use.

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