Think Before You Speak: Being Helpful - Deepstash

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Kind Communication Is Easier Than You THINK - Mindful

Think Before You Speak: Being Helpful

  • Gossip, even if it is true, does not help, and is often harmful to us and others.
  • Bragging about oneself annoys and irritates others.
  • Feedback to others, if not constructive, creates a bad taste in the mouth of those receiving it.
  • It isn’t really helpful to point out that the traffic is bad or that the weather is too hot.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Art of Communication
Talking to another person mindfully should be because you're wanting to "connect" with whomever you're speaking with from a place that is present, kind and respectful.

We have the opportunity to engage with total awareness and recognize the "best of" each other by what we choose to say.

Bring out the "best of yourself"

Make a conscious effort to bring out the best in someone else through your communication.

This makes communicating less "me-centric," which is talking to hear yourself talk, or talking "at" someone rather than "with" them, or being more interested in wanting to "capture" their attention for some kind of pay off. 

Painting with words
Consider communication as an empty canvas to paint with words, think of all of the wonderful and beautiful things you can say to another person.

It's helpful to know that what we say to someone else, might not be what we would want said to us.

Mindfulness In Sleep
Mindfulness In Sleep

Sleep heals our mind and body, but in today’s fast-paced and distracted world, many people are sleep deprived, wreaking havoc on their attention spans, mood and brain functioning. Less sleep also results in weight gain, distress and risk of insomnia.

Mindfulness, or meditation/movement techniques that cultivate awareness and aid rest can tame our never-ending thought patterns, calming our minds for a better sleep.

Mindfulness: Do’s And Don’ts
  1. Daily meditation: Having a daily meditation practice, be it mindfulness, a mental body scan or even chanting is crucial.
  2. Away from the bed: If you are unable to sleep, try to change your place, as the bed has to be associated with sleep.
  3. Sleep apps don’t work: Sleep apps are not to be relied on for sleeping, and one should cultivate our own body to be able to sleep without any aid like sleep apps or even sleeping pills.
  4. Don’t try too hard: Sleeping is an effortless effort, and your mind and body has to be conducive for it to happen. Forced sleep is the primary mistake many insomniacs make. Sleep happens on it’s own if you allow it.
Three Ways To Wind Down
  1. Eliminate distractions, like your smartphones or tablets, that hinder sleep by their radiation, constant notifications and the blue light they emit.
  2. Don’t pressure yourself to sleep and instead focus on calming your mind and practicing mindfulness and relaxed breathing.
  3. Mental body scan is an effective mindfulness meditation that promotes sleep, where one notices one’s breathing and various bodily sensations, while mentally scanning one’s body parts.
Not backed up by science
Not backed up by science

While popular, researchers say there is a serious lack of evidence to back up mindfulness apps, even though they are increasingly perceived as proven treatments for mental health. 

Seeking scientific validation

A handful of studies have been published on the efficacy of mindfulness apps, thanks in part to Headspace, one of the most popular apps in the field. In hopes of getting its app scientifically validated, the organization has partnered on more than 60 studies with 35 academic institutions. In the meantime, in lieu of research proving that apps work, marketers tend to draw misleading, but attractive claims.

The paradox of mindfulness apps

Mindfulness disrupts unhelpful habits. If you get distracted easily or have addictions, mindfulness helps curb these habits. But, in contrast, apps become popular and profitable by getting users lightly addicted to repetitive use. So, can an app really treat addiction, or is it inherently part of the problem? As of now, we don’t know the answer to that question.