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True Resilience Is Understanding Nothing Lasts Forever

Resilience=understanding nothing lasts forever

  • To build a resilient business, be okay knowing that what works now will eventually not work and that you’ll have to evolve and change to stay afloat.
  • For stronger relationships, don’t cling to how strong they are now.  
  • To create a resilient identity, don’t define yourself by who you are today, but by your commitment to always improve yourself. 

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True Resilience Is Understanding Nothing Lasts Forever

True Resilience Is Understanding Nothing Lasts Forever

https://www.riskology.co/true-resilience/

riskology.co

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Key Ideas

Resilience=understanding nothing lasts forever

  • To build a resilient business, be okay knowing that what works now will eventually not work and that you’ll have to evolve and change to stay afloat.
  • For stronger relationships, don’t cling to how strong they are now.  
  • To create a resilient identity, don’t define yourself by who you are today, but by your commitment to always improve yourself. 

Resilience and change

You can only build resilience by accepting that everything will one day fail. The more ready you are to pivot when it does, the sooner you’ll see big changes coming, the better you’ll react to them when they arrive, and the faster you’ll get back to business-as-usual once they hit.

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