The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing - Deepstash

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Marie Kondo: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing

The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing

It explores how putting your space in order causes correspondingly dramatic changes in lifestyle and perspective.

Marie Kondo, the author, recommends that you start by discarding and only then thoroughly organize your space in one go.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Marie Kondo: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing

Marie Kondo: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing

https://fs.blog/2014/12/the-life-changing-magic-of-tidying-up/#

fs.blog

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Key Ideas

The problem with storage

Putting things away creates the illusion that the clutter problem has been solved.

Organizing all your junk better does not equal getting rid of clutter. And unfortunately most people leap at storage methods that promise quick and convenient ways to remove visible clutter.

Tidy by category, not by location

For example, set goals like “clothes today, books tomorrow.” 

We often store the same type of item in more than one place and when we tidy each place separately, we fail to see that we’re repeating the same work in many locations. 

2 essential actions of tidying

  1. Discarding - getting rid of everything you don’t need, by asking “Does this spark joy?”, while holding the items, one by one;
  2. Deciding where to store things;

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

5-Step Decluttering Cheat Sheet
  1. Discarding by category comes first (clothes first, then books, papers etc.)
  2. Break a category into subcategories (e.g. Tops: shirts, sweaters etc.)
  3. Keep on...
Pros of the KonMari Method
  1. Decluttering in one shot allows for immediate transformation: If you tidy a little at a time, you would tidy forever because you wouldn't see the drastic results.
  2. Sorting by ...
Cons of the KonMari Method
  1. This process may not be realistic for larger spaces or families: This guide is written from the point of view of a single woman in her early 30's who lives in a small flat in Japan.
  2. Category sorting may not be as effective if you have a family.
  3. Untagging clothes and immediately hanging them in your closet doesn't always make sense.
  4. The book doesn't address how to deal with children's toys.
KonMari is not full-proof

If you're single, or a couple with a small pet in a tiny apartment it may work. But if you're a large family in a larger space you'll have to pick and choose what works otherwise outsource some of the work.

The junk drawer
The junk drawer

The "junk drawer" has become a universally acknowledged space where you store all the things that doesn't seem to have a place. It is not always a drawer - it could be a room,...

Discard before organizing

Don't think how you will organise items if you're still considering what to keep. You can only assess available storage space when you're done decluttering.

Sort and throw away first before you put back the stuff you've been collecting in your junk drawer.

Tidy by category, not location

Gather all the items of one category in one spot. You can only decide what to keep and what to discard if you know what you have and how much you have.

Categorization is important in the process of decluttering. The five main categories are clothes, books, paper, miscellaneous, mementos. Gather and assess all like items at the same time. If you have two junk drawers, tackle the objects in both spaces at the same time.

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