Loneliness is forced solitude - Deepstash

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How to Enjoy Solitude

Loneliness is forced solitude

Solitude is easy to enjoy if it is a choice, but isolation becomes unbearable when you lack control over your situation.

You can regain enjoyment when you regain some control: Simply improve your social life directly. But for some people, this process is slow or difficult. In that case, it helps to gain control by improving your inner world.

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  • Resilience is the ability to handle and recover from stressful situations and crises. It is not simply coping up with adversity, but to experience growth and flowering, find...
Resilience: Psychological Facts
  1. Resilience comes automatically to most of us.
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  3. Resilience is not an individual trait or quality, but dependent on many contextual factors like one’s upbringing, social factors and health conditions.
  4. It is not a static concept but a flowing, dynamic process based on our life cycle and external conditions.
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Positive solitude is a state of being alone without being lonely, in a contented manner.

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