Use a Red Herring - Deepstash

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Negotiate Like a Ninja: 2 Stealthy Tactics to Try

Use a Red Herring

Instead of making one single offer, try offering 3 possible scenarios:

  1.  Something that works for you but can be very expensive for the other party. A win-lose.
  2.  The red herring. Something that is a lose-lose for both parties. An option through which no one wins.
  3. Something that is a middle ground and a win-win for both.
Social psychology shows when you present  more options (the red herring), the other party will rarely decline all the options.

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Negotiate Like a Ninja: 2 Stealthy Tactics to Try

Negotiate Like a Ninja: 2 Stealthy Tactics to Try

https://www.themuse.com/advice/negotiate-like-a-ninja-2-stealthy-tactics-to-try

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Key Ideas

Negotiation

... is a key life skill, an inherently interpersonal activity that requires a good understanding of human psyche, and it is vital to your success.

Negotiator perform 2 cognitive tasks:

  1. Judgement: Evaluate the content of the available options for its fairness.
  2. Choice: Determine which available option is preferred.

Give Them an Anchor They Can’t Refuse

The value of an offer is influenced by the first realistic number that enters the conversation.

Once this number—or anchor—is set, other judgements are made by adjusting away from that number as the reference point.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

BATNA

Refers to your “best alternative to a negotiated agreement,” or the best outcome you can expect if you fail to reach agreement at the bargaining table with your counterpart. 

An e...

Negotiate the process

Carefully negotiate how you will negotiate in advance. Discussing procedural issues will clear the way for much more focused talks.

Don’t assume you’re all on the same page when it comes to determining when to meet, who should be present, what your agenda will be, and so on. 

Building rapport

You and your counterpart may be more collaborative and likely to reach an agreement if you spend even just a few minutes trying to get to know each other.

 If you’re negotiating over email, even a brief introductory phone call may make a difference. This is one of the most valuable negotiation skills to master.

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Your Final Decision

While making your final decision, keep in mind that:

  • You are clear about your deadline for signing the job offer.
  • Assert your deadline continually.
  • U...
Companies Love Negotiating

Companies like you to submit early in the negotiation and be done with it, so it's best not to fall in their traps and pressure tactics.

Respectfully moving forward, showing transparency and maturity signals to the company that you are not just playing games, and are moving towards a final decision. Being honest, open and communicative is the key.

Negotiating is all about relationship, with communication being the bedrock.

Not Just About Money
  • There are various dimensions in a job to be motivated by, not just what you get paid. Your training period, kind of work, kind of team, and the other things you value, like work-life balance, for instance.
  • You also need to understand what the company values. Salary is a recurring cost, that increases over time while being a subject of gossip due to inequality. A joining bonus is a one-time expense and isn't public.
  • There are other perks to negotiate for, like relocation bonus, which can be easier to arrange.

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Negotiation

Whether it is a high-stakes deal, the price of a used car, or a family issue, we all are bargaining and getting into negotiations.

Negotiation is 90 % planning, along with being educated and ...

The 7 Elements

A negotiation does not have to be a uni-dimensional, one-shot activity.

There are seven points to prepare yourself with:

  1. What do people want?
  2. What is my Plan B?
  3. Creating Value using shared interests.
  4. What's relevant and what's persuasive.
  5. One-shot or multiple rounds?
  6. The best way to communicate.
  7. What are my commitments?
What People Want

Knowing the other party's needs, wants and desires, getting to know what drives their negotiation, is crucial information in the planning stage.

The more we understand the interests of the other negotiating party, the better we can help them get what they want while taking care of our interests.

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