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What Resilience Really Looks Like and How to Build It

Resilience

Resilience is the the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats or significant sources of stress. 

Resilient people are more likely to bounce back from stressful or traumatic situations, and they demonstrate an optimistic attitude, opting to see the lessons in failure.

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What Resilience Really Looks Like and How to Build It

What Resilience Really Looks Like and How to Build It

https://doist.com/blog/how-to-build-resilience/

doist.com

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Key Ideas

Resilience

Resilience is the the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats or significant sources of stress. 

Resilient people are more likely to bounce back from stressful or traumatic situations, and they demonstrate an optimistic attitude, opting to see the lessons in failure.

Resilience is a skill

Resilience isn’t something you’re born with, but something you build. 

Psychologists say it’s comprised of behaviors, thoughts and actions that anyone can learn — a skill that can be improved, just like running or speaking a new language.

Common patterns in building resilience

  • Relying on others. Resilience has a lot to do with leaning on the people around you and with developing strong, supportive connections.
  • Trust your own abilities. Keep a list of accomplishments you’re proud of to serve as a reminder of the times you’ve been resilient before.
  • Be kind to yourself. Give yourself permission to set physical, mental and emotional boundaries.
  • Change your outlook. While you can’t always control the situation, you do have control over how you respond to it. Cultivate optimism in the face of adversity.
  • Take the next step, even if it’s small. Build hope. Make a list that includes a goal, steps to achieve it, potential obstacles and strategies to overcome them.

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