Stage Time: "Two Storytelling Secrets from Walt Disney" | Darren LaCroix - Deepstash

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Stage Time: "Two Storytelling Secrets from Walt Disney" | Darren LaCroix

https://darrenlacroix.com/storytelling-secrets-walt-disney/

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Stage Time: "Two Storytelling Secrets from Walt Disney" | Darren LaCroix
Ever wonder what makes masters, masters? What do they do differently than average people at the same craft? Often we dismiss people as "gifted" rather than strive for figuring it out and pushing ourselves into the "uncomfortable zone." The funny part is with a little investment in focus often there are simple techniques that can ...

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Better Your Storytelling With Emotion And Reaction

Though a cartoon is two-dimensional, to make an emotional connection with the audience characters need action and re-action. Walt Disney had his artists focus on learning that.

Too often presenters are so caught up in what they are going to say they never take time to add the “element” of great delivery which is expressing the emotion and reaction of our characters.

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Keep The Audience’s Perception In Mind

Walt Disney realized that to tell the best stories he had to invest in teaching his artists how to be the best if he wanted his movies to be the best. They then invested more and created their own schools.

We need to be less concerned about how we look at our stories and instead focus on the images we draw in the minds of our audience. We use words to do that and they need just enough detail to let the minds of the audience to paint an image but not so much that we confuse the image in their mind.

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Bring People Into Your World

Walt Disney took suspension of reality a step further building theme parks that brought people into his world. You can bring people into your world through storytelling and brand activation.

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Suspend Reality

Suspending reality is a powerful storytelling technique as it creates a safe, magical world in which to contend with powerful emotions and themes, and it allows the viewer or listener to be transported and associate that escape from reality with the story.

Anything is possible and that becomes inspiration.

Focus on Shared Desires

Disney stories have a near universal appeal because they are designed around struggles and desires that are common to humans everywhere.

You can apply this message to storytelling in your company, too. When you’re communicating with your customers, you should focus on the shared experiences and desires that make your product so valuable.

Stories create “sticky” memories

...by attaching emotions to things that happen. That means those who can create and share good stories have a powerful advantage over others.

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Start with a message

First, settle on your ultimate message; then you can figure out the best way to illustrate it.

Every storytelling exercise should begin by asking: Who is my audience and what is the message I want to share with them? 

Each decision about your story should flow from those questions. 

Use personal experiences

The best storytellers look to their own memories and life experiences for ways to illustrate their message. 

Think of a moment in which your own failures led to success in your career or a lesson that a parent or mentor imparted.

There may be a tendency not to want to share personal details at work, but anecdotes that illustrate struggle, failure, and barriers overcome are what make leaders appear authentic and accessible.