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Stop Chasing Happiness: 17 Alternative Ways to Live a Great Life

https://tinybuddha.com/blog/stop-chasing-happiness-17-alternative-ways-live-best-possible-life/

tinybuddha.com

Stop Chasing Happiness: 17 Alternative Ways to Live a Great Life
"If only we'd stop trying to be happy we'd have a pretty good time." ~Edith Wharton I have a question for you. What would you be willing to sacrifice to be happy? Would you be happy to let go of Netflix? Alcohol? Pizza? Would you be willing to take up a monastic life?

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Happiness comes a lot more easily when we stop thinking about it

Happiness comes a lot more easily when we stop thinking about it

Happiness is more like a place you occupy than an object you obtain. Some days you’ll be there and some days you wont, but the more time you spend thinking about being happy, the less likely you are to spend time being so.

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Sometimes a word can get overused and it becomes confusing

Sometimes a word can get overused and it becomes confusing
  • Contentment
  • Enjoyment
  • Laughter
  • Well-being
  • Peace of mind
  • Cheerfulness
  • Playfulness
  • Hopefulness
  • Blessedness

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A lot of people that are searching for happiness will end up with “shiny object syndrome"

A lot of people that are searching for happiness will end up with “shiny object syndrome"
People bounce from goal to goal because they’re looking for something (or someone) to take away all their suffering. Knowing yourself and what you truly want can help you develop purpose and focus, so that you don’t even have time to waste pondering happiness.

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We all need to learn to separate our happiness from our achievements

We all need to learn to separate our happiness from our achievements

It’s okay to feel content with our lives simply because we have an inherent sense of self-worth. Reaching our goals can obviously bolster this feeling and give us a deep sense of accomplishment, but the absence of achievement should not mean the absence of happiness.

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Living with integrity

It's far better to be yourself and risk having people not like you than to suffer the stress and tension that comes from pretending to be someone you’re not, or professing to like something that yo...

People pleasing

It's the process of trying to guess what other people want and what will make them like us, and then acting accordingly.

It's actually a way of manipulating people's perceptions of us.

We're not that good at pretending

We don’t actually fool anyone when we're trying to look happy, but our real feelings are far from positive.

Our expressions expose us and are registered and mirrored by other people. So trying to suppress negative emotions actually increases stress levels of both people more than if we had shared our distress in the first place.

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Happiness can’t be a goal in itself. Therefore, it’s not something that’s achievable.

The purpose of life is not to be happy. It is to be useful, to be honorable, to be compassionate, to have it make some difference that you have lived and lived well.” - Ralph Waldo Emerso...
The purpose of life is not to be happy. It is to be useful, to be honorable, to be compassionate, to have it make some difference that you have lived and lived well.” - Ralph Waldo Emerson

Happiness is merely a byproduct of usefulness. You don’t have to change the world or anything. Just make it a little bit better than you were born. When you do little useful things every day, it adds ...
Happiness is merely a byproduct of usefulness. You don’t have to change the world or anything. Just make it a little bit better than you were born. When you do little useful things every day, it adds up to a life that is well lived. A life that mattered.

Affective forecasting

It refers to how we predict our future emotions and how certain life events will affect them.

We’re generally pretty bad at it—and that impacts our productivity, our goal setting, and ...

We're bad at predicting our feelings

The main barriers to accurate affective forecasting:

  • Impact Bias: Your tendency to overestimate the intensity and duration of future emotions. 
  • Projection Bias: However you feel in the present, you tend to project that onto the future. 
  • Focalism: When picturing an event in the future, you tend to focus only on that event, to the exclusion of everything else that may happen.

“Our ability to look into the future and think about what will make us most happy is the way that we get to a present that pleases us.”

“Our ability to look into the future and think about what will make us most happy is the way that we get to a present that pleases us.”