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What to Do if You're Owed a Raise

https://twocents.lifehacker.com/what-to-do-if-youre-owed-a-raise-1843738166

twocents.lifehacker.com

What to Do if You're Owed a Raise
Since the coronavirus lockdown started, those of us lucky enough to retain our jobs have been putting a lot of time and energy into work. We’ve been learning new skills, including the art of meeting by Zoom; we’ve also been helping our companies stay productive during a time of heightened uncertainty and anxiety.

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Appropriateness of a raise

Appropriateness of a raise

Since the pandemic, those who have retained their jobs have been putting time and energy into their work and learned new skills.

But, they may have missed the annual performance review due to lockdown. They may wonder if they can ask for a raise or if it is even appropriate during a pandemic.

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Consider when to ask for a raise

Right now, it may not be appropriate to ask for a raise. There’s so much uncertainty and worry at this time. Employers are trying to find a way to keep people.

However, if your employer has been relatively unharmed by the pandemic and associated economic uncertainty, and they are not making any cuts or facing financial risk, it might be okay to raise the topic. It would be better to wait just a little bit longer and ask for a raise a bit later in the year.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The right time to ask

  • How is the financial health of the company? If the company is not doing well, this is not the time to ask for a raise. 
  • How is your manager’s workload? If your manag...

Get salary trends

Every job has a market value. 

  • Compare what you’re currently being paid to the trends you find.

  • Consider your education, years of experience, years you’ve worked for your current employer and any specialized skills or attributes you bring to the table. 

  • Make a list of your accomplishments, taking note of which ones added the most value to the organization

  • Identify a salary range or percentage increase in pay that you’d be happy with. 

Set a meeting

Meet in person and in private. 

You should approach asking for a raise with the same level of seriousness you would have for a job interview or an important presentation, and you should dress accordingly. 

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A raise

... is a recognition that you’re now contributing at a higher level than when your salary was last set. 

A raise isn’t a favor or a gift; it’s a way for employers to pay fair market valu...

It’s normal to ask

It’s not greedy or entitled to ask for a raise.  Unless you work somewhere truly dysfunctional, it’s understood that you work for money. This is okay.

  • you’re not asking for an amount that’s wildly out of sync with the market for your work, and 
  • you have a track record of strong work.

Be emotionally intelligent about your timing

You shouldn’t ask to talk about your salary when your manager is especially harried or having a bad day or nervous about impending budget cuts. 

On the other hand, if you’ve just saved the day with an important client or garnered rave reviews for a high-profile project, or if your boss has seemed particularly pleased with you lately, now might be a particularly good time to make the request.

Take on more responsibility

Command the tasks and responsibilities in your current role, then start solving the problems that your soon-to-be self would be working on.
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Proactively communicate wins

Consistently exceed expectations in terms of your current role and job responsibilities. Take on more than expected, and manage these projects as well as your more senior colleagues.

Share your accomplishments early and often.

Demonstrate your accomplishments

  • Demonstrate that you have taken on additional responsibilities and provide specific details about your accomplishments. 
  • Share examples of projects you have completed and how they’ve positively impacted the business. Was there an increase in revenue? Did you save a customer? 
  • If you’ve received positive feedback from colleagues or other leaders regarding your work, be prepared to share that with your manager as well. 
  • Identify ways you’ve earned money for the company, for example through sales, upsells or creating efficiencies.