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How to (appropriately) use emoji at work

https://zapier.com/blog/ambiguous-emoji-at-work/

zapier.com

How to (appropriately) use emoji at work
Symbols only have meaning because of a shared cultural context, which means you can't assume everyone is interpreting emoji the same way.

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Emoji may create misunderstanding

Emoji may create misunderstanding

The emoji is inherently ambiguous. Symbols only have meaning because of a shared cultural context.

We can't assume everyone is interpreting emoji the same way. It can lead to tension and embarrassment - especially in a work context.

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The wink emoji

Consider 😉. To some, the wink emoji is a way to show that a statement is intended as a joke or a way to be friendly.

Not everyone understands this emoji. For some, the wink emoji implies you're flirty or suggestive, which will change the context of the intended statement.

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Potentially confusing emoji

  • 👌 is a gesture that means "ok" in most English speaking countries, but not that in many other countries.
  • 👊 is considered a "punch," but some people use it as a fist bump.
  • 🤗 is officially named "hugging face." Don't send it to anyone you wouldn't hug - in the face.
  • Some people use 🙏 to mean a high five or a thank you; others use it to mean prayer.

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Three sides to every statement

Every time we communicate, we create three distinct statements:

  1. What we meant to say.
  2. What we did say.
  3. What our audience thinks we said.

Communication is the ability of aligning these three ideas as closely as possible. If you're ever uncertain about the meaning of an emoji, ask your coworkers what they think the emoji means.

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We overestimate our comprehension of the science. 

Part of the problem seems to be that we infer our understanding of scientific text based on how well we have comprehended the language used. This “fluency bias” can also apply to science lectures when it is delivered by an engaging speaker.

We’re seduced by graphs

It doesn’t take a lot to dazzle the average newspaper or magazine reader using the superficial props of science, be that formulas, graphics or jargon. 

One study found that participants were far more likely to support new evidence when it had a graphic visualisation of the correlational evidence than if they had read the same evidence without a graphic.

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“Be A Strong Writer”

“Be A Strong Writer”

This is one of the first pieces of advice people give to those seeking remote work.

When you work remotely, a few misplaced words can become an occupational hazard. Every w...

Accessible Language

  • Use of caps lock, emojis, italics and tildes (~) to make your language flowery, fun and human is a great idea for remote working. You can also use memes and gif images, provided they are not offensive to anyone.
  • Robot speak is not a good way to freely collaborate with your remote peers. Use simple words, and keep it on the casual side, skipping the inaccessible and stilted language. You can also opt for contractions like writing isn’t instead of is not.

Be Clear And Concise

  • Do not obscure your message by words that are there to decorate the sentence and make it sound wordy while camouflaging what you mean.
  • Make good use of qualifiers ("I think, In my opinion") while not coming across as a perpetually confused person. Don’t use qualifiers while making a strong point.
  • While writing documentation, it is prudent to avoid jargon and acronyms.
  • Use complete words and sentences. Shortcuts and acronyms block any actual communication, acting as roadblocks. On the same lines, avoid cliches, idioms and any idiotic sounding phrase that catches the ear well but doesn’t really do any good to anyone.
  • Remote working is often on a global scale, and certain expressions will not be understood by some participants, or worse, will be misunderstood.
  • Your words and tone should be tailored according to your audience. The words are different when you are writing to a client, and when you are in a small group chat with your peers. More people in chat also means adopting a polished, professional tone.

Building Rapport Remotely

To better build rapport and counter isolation do the following:

  • smile, tilt your chin lower so you're not looking down on them, and slow down your speech during your vid...

Relying On Text The Right Way

Voice and video calls can help you feel more in touch with your team and avoid the issues of asynchronous communication like time lags or misunderstandings.

However, you'll likely spend a lot of your day communicating via text as it’s a good way to interact without interrupting their work. So you need to be able to get your point across clearly and simply, show empathy and understanding, and be efficient to avoid wasted time.

Staying Up To Date

Remote workers can feel overwhelmed by the amount of text they have to process. So finding ways to keep on top of what's going on is imperative for communicating efficiently with others.

Create archive lists and CC irrelevant emails to them, so you can save and share them without flooding non-involved people.