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What Confident, Successful Writers Know About Impostor Syndrome

https://writingcooperative.com/what-confident-successful-writers-know-about-impostor-syndrome-9744607863ad

writingcooperative.com

What Confident, Successful Writers Know About Impostor Syndrome
Does a lack of confidence about your writing keep you stopped or stuck? Are you uncertain as to whether your articles are ‘good enough’? You may be letting impostor syndrome, a normal and natural…

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The Impostor Syndrome

The Impostor Syndrome
  • A feeling of being unworthy and secretly cheating your audience/employer or followers is common and natural, especially in the field of writing.

  • 70 percent of millennials have reported that they have experienced impostor syndrome.

  • Underestimating yourself is actually a better strategy than to overestimate your abilities, and exaggerating your efforts.

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Illusory Superiority

This is a form of false confidence, when we believe that we are above average in just about everything.

Some people form a ‘halo’ around themselves at being extremely competent while being the opposite, as they are unable to measure or even see their shortcomings. This is known as the Dunning-Kruger Effect.

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Realistic Goals

Writers who are confident set realistic and controllable goals to overcome the impostor syndrome.

Focusing on days or weeks of progress, with regular review/tracking gets us to know our productivity with supporting data, as opposed to our feelings that are unreliable.

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The First Draft

The first draft of any writer's work needs a lot of improvisation. There is a feeling of ‘whiplash’ that takes place when writers navigate and come in terms with the rework. Writing regularly makes this a normal occurrence, and not something to worry all night.

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Have A Ritual

A lot of the writer's best work is produced when they are at a certain time and space. There may be certain external factors, the morning freshness, the outdoor greens, or the hustle-bustle of the café that gets the creative juices flowing, and it is unique to all.

Get to know what stokes your fire and recreate that setting as a ritual.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Impostor Syndrome

Is a psychological phenomenon that reflects the core belief that you are an inadequate, incompetent, and a failure, despite evidence that indicates you're skilled and successful.

Impos...

Causes of the Impostor Syndrome

From a psychological standpoint, it may be influenced by certain factors early in life, particularly the development of certain beliefs and attitude towards success and one's self-worth.

Signs You Have Impostor Syndrome

  • You don't think you deserve success.
  • You think you're a fake and you're going to be found out.
  • You attribute your success to luck.
  • You think you're not special, anyone can do what you do.
  • You can't internalize your success so you credit others for it.
  • You can't accept praise.
  • Failure is not an option.
  • You use "I'm pretty sure" or "I kind of think" because of lack of confidence.
  • You discredit your achievements.

The Impostor Syndrome

The Impostor Syndrome

It is the feeling that you are not worthy of your designation, title, position or success.

Your accomplishments may be due to luck or effort, but you feel you lack the talent or skill ...

The Reality of Impostor Syndrome

  • The impostor syndrome is like a nagging feeling that our success might be due to luck, good timing, or even a computer error.
  • It makes us think we have done nothing, and that we secretly are a fraud for taking undue credit.
  • The person suffering from an impostor syndrome lives in fear that soon the 'secret' about his true nature will be uncovered.

The Impostor Syndrome: Self-Efficacy Is The Antidote

The antidote to the impostor syndrome is self-efficacy, which is about learning one's own value.

Self-efficacy is described as a perceived ability to succeed at a particular task. It means having rock-solid confidence, a supercharged belief in your ability.

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The Impostor Syndrome And Our Expectations

The Impostor Syndrome And Our Expectations

The new generation has experienced a never-ending stream of expectations, where their achievements are never enough. They are always pushed up on the edge of perfection, being rated and scored ever...

Young Achievers With Impostor Syndrome

  • Most of the young achievers having impostor syndrome feel like a fraud and are constantly judging themselves as not being up-to-the-mark in their endeavours.
  • Their parents may have empathized on achievements too much, and engaged in praising or criticizing them during their formative years.
  • They might attribute their achievements to pure luck, but blame themselves for their failures.

Five Ways To Handle Impostor Syndrome

  1. Instead of a constant judgement of your thoughts, we must find acceptance and get curious over the feelings, dumping the negativity around them.
  2. Delving a bit into our own childhood, we can try to be compassionate towards ourselves, gently handling our emotions and worries.
  3. Realize that the feeling of impostor syndrome is just a byproduct of being out of your comfort zone, and into the learning zone.
  4. Make use of the impostor syndrome to work hard and push yourself to improvise, for yourself.
  5. Engage with such feelings in a healthy, objective way and understand that your achievements are a sign of your intelligence.