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Journaling for Self-Awareness - Tasha Eurich

https://michaelhyatt.com/journaling-for-self-awareness/

michaelhyatt.com

Journaling for Self-Awareness - Tasha Eurich
Charley Kempthorne has been keeping a journal for more than 50 years. Every morning before the sun is in the sky, the professor-turned-painter carefully types out at least 1,000 words reflecting on his past, his beliefs, his family, even his shortcomings. The prolific fruits of his labor reside in an impressive storage facility in Manhattan, ...

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The journaling trap

By examining positive moments too closely, we suck the joy right out of them. 

Therefore, when seeking insights from journaling, explore the negative and not overthink the positive.

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Discharging emotions

Using journaling solely as an outlet for discharging emotions may suck the insight right out of the experience.

The benefits of expressive writing only emerge when we write about both the factual and the emotional aspects of the events we’re describing—neither on its own is effective in producing insight.

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Moderation, even in reflection

To ensure maximum benefits, it’s probably best that you don’t write every day in your journal. 

People should not write about a horrible event for more than a couple of weeks. You risk getting into a sort of cycle of self-pity. But standing back every now and then and evaluating where you are in life is really important

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Small wins compound over time

They make big goals seem manageable and achievable. 

They also help you to move closer to where you want to be and a constant source of motivation.

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“Track your small wins to motivate big accomplishments.”

Pair big goals with small wins

Do this to ensure daily progress and motivation.

Because big goals can be demotivating: that burst of excitement at the beginning quickly wears off. Small wins keep your eyes on the process, not the result and help you see the progress you're making.

Journaling approaches

  • The Gratitude Journal: Simply write about something that you’re grateful for.
  • Morning Pages: Before starting work each day, write 3 pages, long-ha...

What you write, you learn

The key to learning is to stop passively consuming information and start actively engaging with the ideas we encounter.

One effective way researchers have found to reinforce learning is through reflective writing: It promotes the brain’s attentive focus, boosts long-term memory, illuminates patterns and gives the brain time for reflection.

What you write, you control

  • Recording your thoughts in a medium outside your own head helps your mind to become quieter: It stops returning to the same worn-out mental loops over and over. 
  • When you recount and reflect upon your thoughts and experiences you are, in effect, telling your own story. Journaling helps us clarify, edit, and find new meaning in these narratives.

Benefits of journaling

Benefits of journaling

Journaling can help with personal growth and development. By regularly recording your thoughts, you will gain insight into your behaviors and moods.

Journaling can ...

Journaling: An effective tool

  • Journaling can be used to sort through turbulent emotions and to discover hidden lessons from your experience.
  • Art journaling: using mixed media can help you express yourself in refreshing and unusual ways.
  • Journals can help you reflect. Journaling is a method of allowing the light of understanding and compassion to shine on your past.

Tips to get started with journaling

  • Start writing about where you are in your life at this moment. Describe your living situation, your work, and your relationships.
  • Don’t edit your thoughts or feelings and don’t correct your grammar. Don’t censor your thoughts.
  • If there’s something you are struggling with or an event that’s disturbing you, write about it in the third person.