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The Psychology of Revenge: Why It's Secretly Rewarding

https://www.scienceofpeople.com/the-psychology-of-revenge/

scienceofpeople.com

The Psychology of Revenge: Why It's Secretly Rewarding
I wanted revenge. It was such a powerful feeling that I began to research the psychology of revenge and discovered the scientific seeds of this article.

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The Psychology Of Revenge

The Psychology Of Revenge

Revenge is the desire to retaliate to someone who has injured us or made us suffer, either physically or mentally.

Studies revealed that the feeling of revenge is extremely rewarding to the brain. The region of the brain called ‘caudate nucleus’ is stimulated when the victim imagines taking revenge to punish the other person.

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The Long-Term Effects of Seeking Revenge

While movies portray that being able to successfully take revenge will make one feel better, and find some closure, the long term effects of avenging oneself are completely opposite.

The cycle of retaliation continues after seeking revenge, and the pain of the original offence is re-opened, with the emotional wounds aggravated.

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The Alternative To Revenge

Attaining the heights of success by continued discipline and hustle is the best form of revenge, as it makes the original wrongdoer irrelevant and puny in front of one’s enormous stature.

One must set goals and work hard towards them, attaining growth, power and fame.

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Frank Sinatra

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