Do you want it – or do you need it? Here's how you know - Deepstash

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Do you want it – or do you need it? Here's how you know

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2020/jul/24/do-you-really-need-it-or-only-want-it-oliver-burkeman

theguardian.com

Do you want it – or do you need it? Here's how you know
Next time you have the urge to check your phone, or have a second cocktail, remember you might not enjoy it as much as you think

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Desire is separate from enjoyment

Desire  is separate from enjoyment

What we desire, we may not really enjoy. The more you deprive people of something they want, the more they'll desire it, but if they do eventually get it, they...

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Don't follow after desire

Being aware of the distinction between desire and enjoyment can be empowering. Next time you feel the urge to check your phone or eat a meal rich in sugar and fat, you may remember...

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Being able to tolerate minor discomfort

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The rewards come so swiftly that this becomes a more appealing way to live.