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About time: why western philosophy can only teach us so much

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2018/sep/25/about-time-why-western-philosophy-can-only-teach-us-so-much

theguardian.com

About time: why western philosophy can only teach us so much
The long read: By gaining greater knowledge of how others think, we can become less certain of the knowledge we think we have, which is always the first step to greater understanding. By Julian Baggini

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<p> We cannot understand ourse...

We cannot understand ourselves if we do not understand others. Getting to know others requires avoiding the twin dangers of overestimating either how much we have in common or how much divides us.

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To travel around the<b> world’...
To travel around the world’s philosophies is an opportunity to challenge beliefs we take for granted. By gaining greater knowledge of how others think, we can become less certain of the knowledge we think we have, which is always the first step to greater understanding.

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We should not be afraid to gro...
We should not be afraid to ground ourselves in our own traditions, but we should not be bound by them.

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