Why So Many Smart People Aren't Happy - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

Why So Many Smart People Aren't Happy

https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2016/04/why-so-many-smart-people-arent-happy/479832/

theatlantic.com

Why So Many Smart People Aren't Happy
It's a paradox: Shouldn't the most accomplished be well equipped to make choices that maximize life satisfaction? There are three things, once one's basic needs are satisfied, that academic literature points to as the ingredients for happiness: having meaningful social relationships, being good at whatever it is one spends one's days doing, and having the freedom to make life decisions independently.

5

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

Things that make us happy

  • Having meaningful social relationships
  • Being very good at something you do
  • Having the freedom to make life decisions independently.

Three things that don't necessarily contribute to your happiness:

  • Being better educated
  • Being richer
  • Being more accomplished

290 SAVES

327 READS


VIEW

Irrelevant criteria

We know what will make us happy, but we don't know how to measure it. We measure our success by using social comparisons, like a salary, or with awards.

Because people tend to use vague criteria, they are never satisfied when they reach it and always want more. This leads to an unsustainable source of happiness.

144 SAVES

153 READS


Do what you enjoy

If you do what you enjoy and are naturally good at, and if you focus on it long enough, you will probably advance toward mastery anyway, and fame and money will be a byproduct.

184 SAVES

175 READS


Scarcity vs abundance oriented

We view the world in one of two ways:

  • Scarcity-minded approach: My win will make someone else lose. The scarcity mindset plays an important role when we have to fight for our survival.
  • Abundance-oriented approach: There is room for everybody to grow. Doing something meaningful, instead of focussing on a goal, contributes to a happier life overall.

167 SAVES

172 READS


Tying happiness to outcomes

It is not good to tie your happiness to outcomes since that can affect your happiness.

Overcoming some obstacles might pose more obstacles, while other events that we thought would be bad for us might make us grow and learn.

149 SAVES

145 READS


SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Frugality

Frugality means resisting the temptation to spend more than you earn.

Discipline

Self-made millionaires choose moderation over extremes. They often buy used cars, don't live in the most expensive houses and don't try to time the investment market.

Hard Work

A defining characteristic of many millionaires are their willingness to work hard and stick it out in high-paying careers until they are financially independent.

one more idea

Defining "Success"

“Success” isn’t just having lots of money. 

Success is continuously improving who you are, how you live, how you serve, and how you relate.

Lose an hour in the morning, and you will be all day hunting for it.
Lose an hour in the morning, and you will be all day hunting for it.

Putting "first things" first

Start the day with your #1 priority.

Getting up early isn’t enough. You need to put first things first. When you put your top priorities first, then you ensure they make it into the bucket of your day. After your main priorities have been completed, the rest will fill the gaps.

Count your blessings

Spend 5 to 10 minutes at the end of each day writing in detail about three things that went well that day, large or small, and also describing why you think they happened.

Mental subtraction

You don’t know what you’ve got till its gone. 

Consider the many ways in which important, positive events in your life—such as a job opportunity or educational achievement—could have never taken place, and then reflecting on what your life would be like without them.

Savor

We have a tendency to adapt to pleasurable things—a phenomenon called “hedonic adaptation”—and appreciate them less and less over time. 

We can interrupt this process by trying the Give it Up practice, which requires temporarily giving up pleasurable activities and then coming back to them later, this time with greater anticipation and excitement.