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How to prepare your kids for jobs that don't exist yet

https://www.fastcompany.com/40585503/how-to-prepare-your-kids-for-jobs-that-dont-exist-yet

fastcompany.com

How to prepare your kids for jobs that don't exist yet
With total robot domination seemingly impending, preparing the next generation for the future of work can feel like a lost cause. But fear not, the future may be brighter than expected. "There's three job opportunities coming in the future," says Avi Goldfarb, coauthor of Prediction Machines: The Simple Economics of Artificial Intelligence.

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Job opportunities

Job opportunities

Artificial Intelligence will rule the jobs of the future. Future jobs are divided up into:

  • People who build artificial intelligence.
  • People who tell the machines what to do and determine what to do with their output.
  • Celebrities: Actors, sports players, artists, writers, etc. in the entertainment industry. 

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Most valuable combinations of skills

The most significant opportunities will be a combination of the following:
  • people who have good training in computer science
  • people who know how the machines work
  • people who also understand the needs of society and the organization.

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Humanities

Humanities

Our ability to make sense of the world is our biggest asset. While artificial intelligence is good at repetitive tasks, humans are good at discovering creative solutions. 

  • A liberal arts education might be the best antidote to automation. Studying art, philosophy, history, sociology, psychology, and neuroscience could help young people to have a broad range of knowledge that they can use to direct artificial intelligence.
  • Nurturing creative thinking will help prepare your child for the future.

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Don’t specialize

Children should be multi-disciplined. The focus of schools from the Industrial Age is to become really good at one thing. But this is dangerous for the next generation.

Encourage kids to become good at more than one thing. Children should be knowledgable about more than one subject area, giving them adaptability. Or, let them try out a lot of different stuff. Having a variety of experience will be very valuable.

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Stay tech-savvy

Stay tech-savvy

Expect change. Fifty years ago, social media marketers were unimaginable. We can't anticipate how artificial intelligence and automation will change the job landscape.

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Our culture of work

Our culture claims that work is unavoidable and natural. The idea that the world can be freed from work, wholly or in part, has been suppressed for as long as capitalism has existed.

Exploring the abolition of work

  • In 1885, socialist William Morris proposed that in the factories of the future, employees should work only four hours a day.
  • In 1930, John Maynard Keynes predicted that advances in technology would lead to an age of leisure where people might work 15 hours a week.
  • Since the early 2010s, these ideas have been developed further, creating a growing critique of work as an ideology, and exploring alternatives to work.
  • Post-work offers enormous promises: In a life of much less work, life would be calmer, more equal, more communal, more pleasurable, more thoughtful, more politically engaged, more fulfilled.

Work ideology

The work ideology is not natural nor very old.

  • Before the modern era, all cultures thought of work as a means to an end, not an end in itself.
  • Once the modern work ethic was established, working patterns started to shift. Between 1800 and 1900, the average working week shrank from 80 hours to 60 hours, and in the 1970s to roughly 40 hours.
  • In 1979, Bernard Lefkowitz related in his book that people who had given up their jobs reported feelings of "wholeness." During the same period, because wages were high enough, it became possible for most people to work less.
  • During the 80s, work ideology was reimposed by aggressively pro-business governments who were motivated by a desire for social control.
  • By the early 21st century, the work culture seems inescapable.

    New Skills For New Economies

    Successfully combining mathematical and interpersonal skills will be the gateway to many rewarding opportunities.

    Along with mathematical ability, soft skills, like empathy and coopera...

    “Without urgent and targeted action today, to manage the near-term transition and build a workforce with future-proof skills, governments will have to cope with ever-growing unemployment and ine...

    “Without urgent and targeted action today, to manage the near-term transition and build a workforce with future-proof skills, governments will have to cope with ever-growing unemployment and inequality, and businesses with a shrinking consumer base.”

    Klaus Schwab, Founder and Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum.

    The Future Work Market

    Automation will do away with most existing jobs but it will also create new ones. Retraining in a massive scale will be necessary. 

    In particular, manual laborers are at risk of unemployment in the absence of retraining, as the new jobs will be in more specialized areas. Governments and employers in every sector are being urged to retrain and re-skill workers to avoid a crisis.