Some sleep is worse than no sleep for keeping fear in check - Deepstash

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Some sleep is worse than no sleep for keeping fear in check

https://bigthink.com/surprising-science/sleep-study-memory

bigthink.com

Some sleep is worse than no sleep for keeping fear in check
We know that sleeping is important for remembering things. It turns out it is important for forgetting them, too.

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A good night's sleep

A good night's sleep

A good night's sleep is essential for our overall good health. Memories are cemented during sleep, and students are often reminded that they need to have good sleep habits to maximize their learning.

New research shows that sleep is also vital for unlearning things (especially the things that we no longer need to fear). These findings may prove useful in helping those with or at risk of developing anxiety or post-traumatic stress disorder.

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Some sleep vs no sleep

  • New research shows that that people without sleep fare better in learning what to fear and not fear than those getting only some sleep.
  • Test subjects learned to associate colors with electric shocks, but only some unlearned it.
  • The findings could be used to help create new treatments for those at risk of PTSD or anxiety.

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Our sleep-wake pattern

Our molecular clock inside our cells aims to keep us in sync with the sun

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The lifestyle imbalance

Thomas Edison said that sleep is "a bad habit." Like Edison, we seem to think of sleep as an adversary and try to fight it at every turn. The average American sleeps less than the recommended seven hours per night, mostly due to electric lights, television, computers, and smartphones. 

However, we are ignoring the intricate journey we're designed to take when we sleep.

Stage One Sleep

When we fall asleep, the nearly 86 billion neurons in our brain starts to fire evenly and rhythmically. Our sensory receptors become muffled at the same time.

The first stage of shallow sleep lasts for about 5 minutes.

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Slow-wave sleep (deep sleep) – SWS

About 80% of our sleeping is of the SWS variety, identified by slow brain waves, relaxed muscles and deep breathing.

Deep sleep is important for the consolidation of memories. New experience...

Rapid eye movement (dreaming) - REM

Dreaming accounts for 20% of our sleeping time.

The length of dreams can vary from a few seconds to almost an hour. During REM sleep, the brain is highly active. The muscles are paralyzed, and the heart rate increases. Breathing can become erratic. 

Sleep quantity

Although eight hours is the common mention, optimum sleep can vary from person to person and from age to age.

One review that worked through 320 research articles concluded 7 - 9 hours of sleep are enough for adults. According to experts, too little or too much sleep can both have a negative impact on your health.

Snoring isn’t harmful

Although snoring may be harmless for most people, it can be a symptom of a life-threatening sleep disorder called sleep apnea, especially if it is accompanied by severe daytime sleepiness. 

You can "cheat" on sleep

Sleep experts say most adults need between seven and nine hours of sleep each night for optimum performance, health, and safety. 

The resulting sleep deprivation has been linked to health problems such as obesity and high blood pressure, negative mood and behavior, decreased productivity, and safety issues in the home, on the job, and on the road.

Turning up the radio

... opening the window, or turning on the air conditioner are effective ways to stay awake when driving.

These "aids" are ineffective and can be dangerous to the person who is driving while feeling drowsy or sleepy. 

It's best to pull off the road in a safe rest area and take a nap for 15-45 minutes. Caffeinated beverages can help overcome drowsiness for a short period of time.