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How to Find Your Hidden Creative Genius: 5 Simple Steps

https://jamesclear.com/creative-genius

jamesclear.com

How to Find Your Hidden Creative Genius: 5 Simple Steps
Want to uncover the creative genius inside of you? Read this article to learn the strategies that the best artists and creators use.

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Finding Your Creative Genius Takes Years

Finding Your Creative Genius Takes Years

Most groundbreaking work takes at least a full decade or more to reveal itself.

For example, one study found that of 500 famous musical pieces, nearly all of them were created after year 10 of the composer's career. Similar patterns were found with poets and painters and even in the fields of science and math. This period of hard work is also referred to as the 'ten years of silence.'

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Give Yourself Permission to Create Junk

Successful writers do not write elegant first drafts, nor do they feel wildly enthusiastic and confident.

Creating something useful and compelling means you have to permit yourself to let the inspiration flow. You will write a lot of junk but can then sift through it to find bits and pieces of brilliance here and there.

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Create on a Schedule

The act that will uncover creative genius is by forcing yourself to create regularly and on a schedule, not just create when you feel inspired.

The best thing you can do is to do a huge volume of work. Creative genius becomes visible when you work consistently to get the average ideas out of the way.

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Finish Something

Stop researching, planning, and preparing. Just do the work.

It doesn't have to be brilliant. You just need to prove to yourself that you can produce something.

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Don't Judge Your Work Too Harsh

People who consistently create something will begin to judge their own work.

When you start to overjudge your work, it is natural to feel disappointed that your creation does not live up to your expectations. Practice enough self-compassion not to let self-judgment take over and prevent delivery.

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Share Your Work Publicly

It will encourage you to do your best work and will also provide feedback. You will see others connect with what you create, and will be inspired to care even more.

What seems simple to you is often brilliant to another person. You'll miss that if you fail to share.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Creativity

The creative process is the act of making new connections between old ideas or recognizing relationships between concepts.

While being creative isn't easy, nearly all great ideas follow a sim...

The 5 Step Creative Process

  1. Gather new material directly related to your task as well as learning general material by becoming fascinated with a wide range of concepts.
  2. Thoroughly work over the materials in your mind.  Examine what you have learned by looking at the facts from different angles and experimenting with fitting various ideas together.
  3. Step away from the problem. Next, you put the problem completely out of your mind and go do something else that excites you and energizes you.
  4. Let your idea return to you. After you have stopped thinking about it, your idea will come back to you with a flash of insight and renewed energy.
  5. Shape and develop your idea based on feedback. For any idea to succeed, you must release it out into the world, submit it to criticism, and adapt it as needed.

Creativity is learned

Some people are primed to be more creative than others.

However, nearly every person is born with some level of creative skill and the majority of our creative thinking abilities are trainable.

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Genius is not tied to age

Genius is not tied to age

Genius is tied up with precocity. We think brilliance requires youth and energy and freshness. Mozart wrote his breakthrough Piano Concerto No. 9 in E-Flat-Major at the age of twenty-one. T.S. ...

Early and late bloomers

Prodigies like Picasso, who created a masterpiece at age twenty, tend to be "conceptual" in the sense that they start with a clear idea of where they want to go, and then accomplish it. Picasso once said that he could hardly understand the importance given to the word 'research.'

But late bloomers tend to work the other way around. Their goals are imprecise and their procedure experimental. They build their skills gradually throughout their careers, improving slowly over long periods.

Experimental artists

Experimental artists are perfectionists and are typically plagued by frustration in their inability to reach their goal. Their creativity proceeds through trial and error and takes a long time to come to fruition.

  • When Cézanne was painting a portrait of the critic Gustave Geffroy, he made him endure eighty sittings before he declared the project a failure. He was notorious for slashing his canvases to pieces in fits of frustration.
  • Mark Twain was the same. He fiddled and despaired and revised and gave up on "Huckleberry Finn" so many times that the book took him nearly a decade to complete.

Pamela Slim
“We are made to create. We feel useful when we create. We release our ‘stuckness’ when we create. We reinvent our liv..."

Pamela Slim

Creativity is complex

It means producing something novel or original, evaluating, solving problems, whether on paper, on stage, in a laboratory or even in the shower.

Knowing how to think

Geniuses know “how” to think, instead of “what” to think.

People who are more creative can simultaneously engage brain networks that don’t typically work together.