deepstash

Beta

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

The Procrastinators Ultimate Guide: The 6 Types (With Tips for Each One)

https://medium.com/swlh/the-procrastinators-ultimate-guide-the-6-types-with-tips-for-each-one-3697f8da2408

medium.com

The Procrastinators Ultimate Guide: The 6 Types (With Tips for Each One)
But most people don’t even have that choice. After trying fifty different blog tips without success, procrastinators start to doubt. If you don’t want to be a slave of your emotions, keep reading…

10

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

What you must know about procrastination

What you must know about procrastination
  • You can put things off without being lazy.
  • It's your emotions that decide to procrastinate, not logic. Emotions prioritize short-term gratification.
  • The problem is not about the task, but how you treat it.
  • When you don't make tasks your priority, you'll put things off.

295 SAVES

1.29k READS

VIEW

The more you work, the less it feels like a grind

Procrastinators severely overestimate how hard it is to finish a task.

While it can be very tough to start, you'll gain momentum and achieve ten times more work with the same willpower. The result will also be much more rewarding.

278 SAVES

1.06k READS

The optimistic procrastinator

You overestimate your skills and underestimate the challenge. Your goals may be too small, or you didn't break the big goals into daily tasks.

What you find yourself doing: You don't write a deadline on your calendar, but promise to start tomorrow. You may even tell everyone how easy it is or what you plan to do.

Solution: Commit to a deadline, or make it a challenge to get done as much as possible.

267 SAVES

810 READS

The distracted procrastinator

You may love your work, but other tasks seem more appealing because you gravitate towards the path of least resistance.

Typical behaviors:

  • You think bad habits are good in moderation and don't respect your time blocks.
  • You spent most of your day in minor tasks.
  • You never feel like being 100% present at work or play.

Solution: Block your distractions. Plan days where you reward yourself generously, to make smaller temptations less attractive.

284 SAVES

791 READS

The perfectionist procrastinator

Preparation scares you. You want improved quality when you didn't work for long enough to optimize. You may waste your time by giving too much time to irrelevant details.

Typical behaviours:

  • You know what to do, but irrational thoughts pull you back.
  • You spend hours planning the introduction.
  • You feel dissatisfied and always want to add one more change.

Solution: Shift your focus from results to actions.

267 SAVES

672 READS

The guilty procrastinator

Your interpretation of failure is preventing you from working.

Typical behaviours:

  • You accept distractions because you already lost, but then think things will eventually fix themselves.
  • You feel people are mad at you or don't understand your limited position.
  • You slack in other areas because you think one loss justifies failing in other areas.

Solution: When you failed, you did not understand how much you actually learned. Take a day off to stop thinking.

252 SAVES

589 READS

The busy procrastinator

You have over-committed and have no time left. Even if you have time, you sometimes don't see the point in spending time on those tasks.

Typical behaviours:

  • You're multitasking.
  • You get about 70% done off your endless to-do list, but don't see results.
  • You want to spend time will all your favourite projects.

Solution: If a task is irrelevant, stop the task. Use only the best-performing ways to achieve your objectives. Prioritize your goals and work on one at a time. Also, know that you can make progress at a slower pace.

245 SAVES

445 READS

The disorganized procrastinator

Your poor time-management/prioritization skills are setting you back. You hate routines because you feel they take away your freedom, but then you never have time to do what you love.

Typical behaviours:

  • When you want to work, you instead waste time preparing the workspace.
  • You do a quick two-minute task and then add other little jobs that fill your day.
  • If you find yourself procrastinating, you will rather finish what you're doing instead of your important work.

Solution: Learn to work smarter with the Pomodoro technique and the Eisenhower's Matrix.

263 SAVES

513 READS

5 mindsets that will influence your work ethic

  • Impulsivity. Impulsive people prefer short-term results instead of longer tasks.
  • Sense of urgency. Our motivation to finish a task is inversely proportional to the time we have left. But we also underestimate how long a job takes if the deadline is far away.
  • Perception of work. Work looks more daunting than it really is.
  • Agreeableness. Trying to surprise others with unexpected work patterns. But it is inconsistent and makes it harder for people to gauge you.
  • Busyness because you don't manage your time well.

252 SAVES

514 READS

How to get work done today

  • Create checklists by imagining the best way to complete your task in detail.
  • The 2-minute rule. Take enough 2-minute tasks to create momentum. Start with anything, but end with tasks related to your intended work.
  • The hour non-negotiable. Force yourself to work on your project for the first hour of the day to give you momentum for the rest of the day.
  • The celebration/resting day. Plan a day where you allow yourself to do anything you enjoy doing, regardless of what it is.
  • Habit bunching. Create support habits, such as making coffee before you start working.
  • Mini-days (time-bocking). If a day feels too dull, break it down into mini-days: one for work, one for learning skills, and one for relaxation.
  • The hourly challenge. Plan to give your best work every hour. Define how much work you need to do in that hour to consider it a personal record.
  • Buffering. Allow a 30-50% margin of error for all your expectations.
  • OKR Goal-setting system. (Objective Keyword Result). Set a quarterly or monthly goal. Give yourself three actionable metrics based on numbers. (e.g., Make 500 sales calls in three months.)
  • Environment optimization. When you finish using a room, make it ready so you can use it next time. Keep distractions out of sight.

303 SAVES

660 READS

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Paul J. Meyer

"Productivity is never an accident. It is always the result of a commitment to excellence, intelligent plann..."

Paul J. Meyer

Frank Sinatra

Frank Sinatra

“Luck is only important in so far as getting the chance to sell yourself at the right moment. After that, you’ve got to have talent and know how to use it.”

33 more ideas

Learn To Use Procrastination

Learn To Use Procrastination

The desire to procrastinate is a healthy brain craving, a natural need for novelty and curiosity. We must stop the negative self-talk we have towards us not working as a machine all the time. The l...

Observe Your Need To Procrastinate

  1. Observe the need to procrastinate, recognizing and being aware of your desire. This is called meta-recognition and is what all the Gurus keep talking about when they speak about awareness.
  2. Label and accept your urge to waste your time, but without any negative judgement.
  3. Validate your urge to procrastinate, increasing your self-esteem.
  4. Approach procrastination as a friend, not as a threat.

The Real Enemy of Flow

The biggest obstacle, the main villain hampering our productivity is always in your hands, and rarely in your pockets. _It’s your smartphone. It needs to be powered off for some time. Your laptop, clamouring for attention, is not helping either. Remove all distractions and notifications so that you can get in the ‘flow’ mode.

Creating friction between us and the open black hole of the online distractions helps us focus on work.

Being purposeful with your day

Being purposeful with your day

Time management is about taking control of the time you do have available and using it optimally for productivity while creating balance.

How to plan your day

Much advice about time management is about creating a to-do list, reminding you what you want to do. However, it's more important to use a schedule, which tells you when you're going to do it.

  • Create "bookends" for each day. Consider your morning and evening routines, then "block" in time for your most important tasks. For example, a 2-hour writing-block every morning after breakfast.
  • Set aside time for your most important projects. The object is to be purposeful about what and when you're going to do something.
  • Schedule in breaks. A schedule has to be realistic. That means including time for breaks, food, exercise, social time, and other "non-school" tasks that keep you happy.

Be aware of how you’re spending your time

To build a better time management system, you need to know what you currently spend your time on. You need to know where you're losing time to the wrong things.

To track your time, spend a few days writing a "time log" to track how you spend your day.