Why it pays to declutter your digital life - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

Why it pays to declutter your digital life

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20190104-are-you-a-digital-hoarder

bbc.com

Why it pays to declutter your digital life
I have a confession: there are 20,577 unread emails in my inbox, 31,803 photos on my phone and 18 browser tabs currently open on my laptop. Digital clutter has invaded my life and I have no idea what to do with it.

3

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

Digital hoarding

Digital hoarding

Is the reluctance to get rid of the digital clutter we accumulate through our work and personal lives, to the point of loss of perspective, which eventually results in stress and disorganisation.

It can make us feel just as stressed and overwhelmed as physical clutter.

37 SAVES

139 READS


VIEW

Recognize digital hoarding problems

Recognize digital hoarding problems

How can you tell if you have a digital hoarding problem?

Think back over the last week and see if you can remember a time when you struggled to find a digital file on your phone or computer – maybe someone’s address in an email chain, or a really great cocktail you Instagrammed for posterity.

31 SAVES

97 READS


Digital hoarding and online storage

Digital hoarding and online storage

Platforms like Google Drive are “open temptations” for hoarding because they make it so easy for us to accumulate files and almost never prompt us to review them, The sense that something is retrievable if we just store it somewhere provides a false sense of security. And there’s plenty of storage available

40 SAVES

138 READS


SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Don’t Rely On Your Memory

If you want to remember things, don't rely on your memory. Put it in writing or in a digital notebook.

Make Back-Ups Of Everything

  • Make sure to back up your computer files.
  • Make duplicates for your car and home keys.
  • Scan your IDs, passports and bank details, and put it all in a secured folder on your computer.

Keep all your financial records, birth certificates, land titles and insurance in one folder, preferably in a safe.

Have a designated place for everything

  • Sort out your clothes, cleaning materials and everything else and keep them in labeled containers or closets at home. 
  • Organize your work space well so that your every move is conserved, knowing exactly where everything is.

Doing this will take time, but it is easier to find what you need.

13 more ideas

Clear your wardrobe

Take everything out of your wardrobe and pile it on the bed. 
  • Create 3 piles; things to go to charity, to sell or to the bin. 
  • Anything you haven’t worn in the past 6 m...

Trim your wallet

Take out all the cards in your wallet and go through what is needed on a regular basis. 

Get rid of your coffee loyalty cards, and any cards that are rarely needed put in in a safe place. The result is you have less to carry and getting to the card you need is easier.

Get rid of your Smartphone

Many things you are using your smartphone for are time fillers. You can read emails at home or at work. You need to plan for banking and google maps, most things you can live without. 

Go back to basics and buy yourself a simple phone. Try it for one month and see how you go.

Digital minimalism

Digital minimalism is a "philosophy of technology use in which you focus your online time on a small number of carefully selected and optimised activities that strongly support things you val...

The principles of digital minimalism

  1. Clutter is costly. Digital minimalists recognise that cluttering their time and attention with too many devices, apps, and services creates an overall negative cost that can swamp the small benefits that each individual item provides in isolation.
  2. Optimisation is important.To truly extract the full potential benefit of a technology, it’s necessary to think carefully about how you’ll use it.
  3. Intentionality is satisfying. Digital minimalists derive significant satisfaction from their general commitment to being more intentional about how they engage with new technologies.

Our relationship with technology

"The underlying behaviours we hope to fix are ingrained in our culture, and […] they’re backed by powerful psychological forces that empower our base instincts. To re-establish control, we need to move beyond tweaks and instead rebuild our relationship with technology from scratch, using our deeply held values as a foundation." - Cal Newport