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11 Modern Leadership Lessons from History's Masters

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/296350

entrepreneur.com

11 Modern Leadership Lessons from History's Masters
Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. "How can I inspire others to follow my lead?" Aspiring influencers have wrestled with this question since the beginning of time, and those who emerged and ultimately became legendary leaders did so because they were willing to learn from the very best.

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The lesson we all got to learn from Martin Luther King, Jr.

Throughout history, some individuals got to play bigger roles than others. Among them, Martin Luther King, Jr. taught us that the success of a cause depends directly on the involvement of the people who joined it.

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The lesson learned from the movie 'Kim Man-bok'

According to the main character's behaviour, one should used other means of negotiation besides persuasion, which is, undoubtedly, of high importance. For instance, why not try using the very language of the counterparts, if possible. It can lead to unexpectedly good results.

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The lesson learned from Buddha

Buddha's belief that anybody can changed is a powerful tool in the hands of good coaches. Having trust in people's ability to change can prove to be way more effective than believing that they can't.

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The lesson learned from Peter Drucker

The one known as the 'father of modern management', Peter Drucker, came to the conclusion that the more one charges for providing others with his advice, the more the advice is valuable. So, if he could do it, maybe it is indeed worth giving this idea a chance.

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The lesson learned from Theodore Roosevelt

According to Theodore Roosevelt's famous quote, individuals are interested into working with others who show that they care. This idea proves to be true over and over again, in all the aspects of life.

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The lesson learned from Nelson Mandela

Nelson Mandela taught us what is maybe one of the most valuable management lessons: one does not need to use authority in order to lead effectively. Instead, getting to know your people and finding out what their motivations are can prove way more efficient in the long run.

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The lesson learned from Max Planck

The German theoretical physicist once stated that one's perception of the things changes how things really are. Therefore, choosing to have a good influence on your people, as a manager, will most certainly have better results than having a negative attitude and mind-set.

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The lesson learned from Winston Churchill

The great Winston Churchill gave everybody a lesson worth being remembered for generations to come: if you want people to understand you, you might as well communicate by using simple and clear words. The main point is to get your idea transmitted, after all.

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The lesson learned from Ann Bradstreet

Known as one of the first internationally recognized writers writing from the New World, Ann Bradstreet enabled the American colonists to express their identity as different as possible from England, even though she was an English woman herself.

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The lesson learned from Marcus Aurelius and Cato

Great leaders do not always need words in order to lead. One fine example of this is illustrated by Marcus Aurelius and Cato, who succeeded to inspire individuals by the way they lived their lives, by their deeds.

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The lesson learned from Helen Keller

One of the most valuable lessons that humanity can learn is to make the best of what one has. For instance, Helen Keller, who was blind and deaf as a child, succeeded to earn a bachelor's degree, publish books, co-found the ACLU, therefore inspiring an entire world with her amazing story.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Steve Job's effectiveness boiled down to this:

He inspired team members first so that they were driven to live up to his exacting standards when the situation called for it.

Get this equation backwards and you will wonder why&...

The formula for being an inspirational driver

  • Know your "noble cause." Jobs understood that if teams don’t find their work meaningful, they perceive challenging directives from a leader as arbitrary demands rather than a call to sacrifice for a higher purpose.
  • Tell your story early and often. If you can’t weave your ideas into a clear, compelling story, those ideas remain abstract words likely to be forgotten.
  • Push, but within boundaries. Make sure you have a clear end point and time line in mind before you go into "push" mode. Intense work with no clear end in sight is demoralizing.

Confidence And Leadership

Confidence And Leadership

To be a stronger leader, you need to practice self-confidence. If you’re always second-guessing yourself and feeling shy around your coworkers, they won’t follow you.

Confi...

Leaders And Creativity

Charismatic leaders think outside the box and aren’t afraid to push the limits.

While others may see this kind of push as risky, these leaders are the ones leading the way and driving innovation. When a problem arises, leaders don’t see only the difficulties. Instead, they rise to the challenge and see it as an opportunity. In business, this creativity can lead to powerful change and transformation, which can inspire and motivate others.

Having A Vision And Knowing How To Communicate It

"Leadership requires two things: a vision of the world that does not yet exist and the ability to communicate it.” - Simon Sinek

Because leaders value innovation, they are focused on the future and how they can improve it. They have a dream and direction that motivates and inspires others.

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Learning to communicate effectively

Effective communication is an attainable and deliberately acquired skill set, one that can be learned and practiced over time.

While it’s true that individual attributes can make

Smoke out original though

To become a more effective communicator, you must 'smoke out' original thought. Rather than conforming to the status quo, make a conscious decision to abandon overdone and clichéd material/

Citing tired platitudes might win you a few "cool points" in social media circles, but they will only take you so far if you're truly striving to effectuate change. 

Prepare an impactful delivery

Once you’ve developed a fresh idea, work on organizing your message and polishing your delivery. Think about:

  • How  you will launch a stunning opening and closing line
  • How you will organize your material succinctly so that it is both moving and memorable (perhaps tweetable and repeatable)
  • Compelling details that should be included.
  • Your vocal and non-verbal communication (body language).