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A high-carb diet may explain why Okinawans live so long

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20190116-a-high-carb-diet-may-explain-why-okinawans-live-so-long

bbc.com

A high-carb diet may explain why Okinawans live so long
The search for the "elixir of youth" has spanned centuries and continents - but recently, the hunt has centred on the Okinawa Islands, which stretch across the East China Sea. Not only do the older inhabitants enjoy the longest life expectancy of anyone on Earth, but the vast majority of those years are lived in remarkably good health too.

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300% more centerians in Okinawa

68 per 100,000 people. 

It’s not that they live long lives, but also healthy lives too, which lead to the proposal that their diet has something to do with it.

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The Okinawan diet

It's high on carbohydrates, low in protein and in calories. 

Okinawans eat an abundance of green and yellow vegetables – such as the bitter melon – and various soy products. Although they do eat pork, fish and other meats, these are typically a small component of their overall consumption, which is mostly plant-based foods.

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The Okinawan Ratio

The optimum ratio is 10 parts carb to one part protein (10:1) and is found in the Okinawan diet.

It is quite the opposite of current popular diets that advocate a high protein, low carb diet. We belive carbs are bad, but Okinawa diet is providing counter evidence.

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