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How to Negotiate Nicely Without Being a Pushover

https://hbr.org/2015/04/how-to-negotiate-nicely-without-being-a-pushover

hbr.org

How to Negotiate Nicely Without Being a Pushover
We all want it both ways: to get what we want from a tough negotiation and to walk away with our relationship intact. The good news is that kind of outcome is possible. But how exactly do you drive a hard bargain while also employing soft skills?

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Negotiating without being a pushover

Do:

  • Frame the negotiations as a problem-solving challenge.
  • Take the time to make small talk. It’ll build connections you can leverage later on.
  • Stress the areas on which you agree, and use words like “we” to signal you are invested in the relationship.

Don’t:

  • Reflexively cave on issues because you think it’ll win you favor. 
  • Simply ask what the other side wants. Ask why they want it.
  • Mistake impact for intent. The other side may have their own unique pressures that restrict their ability to maneuver.

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  • Job content. Consider whether you will derive job satisfaction from the offer. To answer this question, you need to know the kinds of activities you want to be involved in and the skills you want to use. You will need a deep understanding of what's expected of you to decide whether you do indeed want the job.
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