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6 Exercises To Reverse Bad Posture

Doorway Stretch

Doorway Stretch
  • Standing in a doorway, lift your arm so it's parallel to the floor.
  • Bend at the elbow so your fingers point toward the ceiling.
  • Place your hand on the doorjamb.
  • Slowly lean into your raised arm and push against the doorjamb for 7-10 seconds.
  • Relax the pressure and then press your arm against the doorjamb again, this time coming into a slight lunge with your legs so your chest moves forward past the doorjamb for 7-10 seconds.
  • Repeat this stretch two to three times on each side.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

6 Exercises To Reverse Bad Posture

6 Exercises To Reverse Bad Posture

https://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-15552/6-exercises-to-reverse-bad-posture.html

mindbodygreen.com

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Key Ideas

Back Pain And Posture

Maintaining the natural lumbar curve in your low back is essential to preventing posture-related back pain. This natural curve works as a shock absorber, helping to distribute weight along the length of your spine.

When you neglect your posture, you invite chronic back pain. Standing up and exercising helps with adjusting postural distortions and can help stop back pain.

The Chin Tuck Stretch

  • Sitting or standing, roll your shoulders back and down.
  • While looking straight ahead, place two fingers on your chin, slightly tuck your chin and move your head back .
  • Hold for 3-5 seconds and then release.
  • Repeat 10 times.
  • Tip: The more of a double chin you create, the better the results. 

The Wall Angel Stretch

  • Stand with your back against a flat wall with your feet about four inches from the base. Maintain a slight bend in your knees. 
  • Bring your arms up with elbows bent so your upper arms are parallel to the floor and squeeze your shoulder blades together, forming a letter "W". Hold for 3 seconds.
  • Straighten your elbows to raise your arms up to form the letter “Y.” Repeat this 10 times, starting at “W,” holding for 3 seconds and then raising your arms into a “Y.” Do 2-3 sets.

Doorway Stretch

  • Standing in a doorway, lift your arm so it's parallel to the floor.
  • Bend at the elbow so your fingers point toward the ceiling.
  • Place your hand on the doorjamb.
  • Slowly lean into your raised arm and push against the doorjamb for 7-10 seconds.
  • Relax the pressure and then press your arm against the doorjamb again, this time coming into a slight lunge with your legs so your chest moves forward past the doorjamb for 7-10 seconds.
  • Repeat this stretch two to three times on each side.

Hip Flexor Stretch

  • Kneel onto your right knee with toes down.
  • Place your left foot flat on the floor in front of you.
  • Place both hands on your left thigh.
  • Press your hips forward until you feel a good stretch in the hip flexors.
  • Contract your abdominals and slightly tilt your pelvis back while keeping your chin parallel to the floor.
  • Hold this pose for 20-30 seconds, and then switch sides.

The X-Move

You need the resistance band to do the following:
  • Sit on the floor with your legs extended forward.
  • Place the middle of the resistance band around the bottom of your feet and cross one side over the other to form an "X".
  • Grasp the ends of the band with your arms extended in front of you.
  • Pull the ends of the band toward your hips, bending your elbows so they point backward.
  • Hold and slowly return. Do 8-12 repetitions for three sets.

The V-Move

You need the resistance band to do the following:
  • While standing, stagger your feet so one is slightly behind the other.
  • Grasp the handles, or the ends, of the resistance band and lift your arms upward and slightly outward away from your body about 30 degrees.
  • Keep a slight bend in your elbows. Stop at shoulder level; hold and return.
  • Make sure to keep your shoulder blades down and back straight.
  • Repeat this exercise for 2 minutes each day, five days a week.

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Aches and pains
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With the 2020 pandemic, many people are required to stay home.

If you're one of these people, you may be noticing new aches and pains you did not experience at the office.

Ergonomic furniture

Many companies follow an ANSI-HFS standard in the design of their computer workstations, which incorporates ergonomic furniture and accessories.

Most homes don't have the space to accommodate ergonomic office furniture, nor do most people invest in it. If you're working from home using your computer on a regular table or you sit in a lounge chair or on your bed, chances are you aren't in a healthy posture. It could potentially lead to musculoskeletal injury, carpal tunnel syndrome, or even deep vein thrombosis.

Your computer screen

View your computer screen with a straight neck. Put your screen in front of you at a comfortable viewing height. Don't look down at your screen or angle your screen, so you must twist your neck.

You may have to put the screen on a pile of books or on a cardboard box to raise it to a comfortable viewing position.

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When you spend hours at your desk every day, even the smallest features of your workspace – such as the position of your monitor or the height of your chair– can greatly affect your productivity and e...
Lighting
  • The best kind of light you can have in your office is natural light. It helps our bodies maintain our internal "clocks" or circadian rhythms which affects our sleep and energy. 
  • Poor lighting, whether it's dim lighting or harsh lighting from overhead fluorescent lights, can cause eye strain, stress, and fatigue.
  • Don't sit with your back to a window unless you can shade it.
  • Don't sit facing a window because that will make reading a monitor difficult. 
  • If you use a task lamp at your desk, position it so the bottom of the lampshade is at about the height of your chin when it's on.
Plants
  • Indoor plants prevent fatigue during attention-demanding work. 
  • Even just having a window view of live greenery can be restorative and keep us focused.
  • A peace lily plant requires little sunlight to survive and you only have to water it when the soil is dried out and is also great for cleaning the air.
  • Cacti and aloe plants are other low-maintenance plants to consider.

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Mood And Posture

The more time a person spends in a bad posture, the more the body’s muscles and ligaments embrace it as normal. 

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Consequences Of Bad Posture
  • Slouching promotes low mood, decreased energy levels and can even impair student performance on a math test.
  • Upright posture is linked with improved mood and energy levels among people with symptoms of depression.
  • The bent-over posture associated with smartphone use could hamper breathing and impair respiratory function.
Combating Bad Posture
  • Switch up your desk setup in ways that promote proper posture.
  • Pulling exercises will strengthen them your back muscles, but upright or bent-over rows are ideal.
  • Planks, push-ups, dead lifts and other exercises that make you hold your body in a rigid position help develop posture as they activate your core and stabilizer muscles.
  • Glute bridges help to increase strength and flexibility of hips and that promotes stable movement and posture.
  • Limit “flexion” exercises that involve curling your spine into a C-shape. 
  • If you spend the bulk of your week sitting with poor posture a few hours of exercise won’t fix it.