Loneliness In A Relationship

Loneliness In A Relationship

... especially if you aren't making an effort to connect with your partner

Make the relationship a priority. This means setting boundaries with work, kids, and other obligations in order to focus on meeting each other’s needs.

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Self Improvement

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Caregiver Loneliness

There's very specific loneliness that can creep in when you're responsible for the care of another person — be it an elderly parent, a sick sibling, a disabled partner, etc.

So even though it's a big job, it's important to not forget about yourself. Find a supportive friend to talk to without judgment, or attend a support group.

Work Loneliness

... if you don't have any connections at your job.

If you spend a lot of time working and are feeling super lonely, it can help to try to find an organization that also supports your type of work. Corbett says. And, again, make sure you create meaningful connections outside of work.

Lack Of Family Support

Not all people have strong family connections. This can produce loneliness, especially on holidays when ... gatherings are an emphasis.

 Seek organizations where [you] can gain a community. Or join a club, work on your friendships, or create a family of your own. Not all family ties are strong ones, but that doesn't mean you have to be lonely.

Loneliness Within Friendships

There are different kinds of friendships such as acquaintances versus confidantes. If one only has acquaintances and no one to whom they can truly confide or be authentic, they will often experience loneliness.

Work on establishing those deeper connections. By being authentic, getting out there, joining groups, and being friendly, you can find your people.

Transitional Loneliness

Major changes can create a sense of loneliness, even if they're positive. You might be leaving a job or starting a new job, ending a relationship or embarking on a new relationship, getting married, getting divorced, [or] starting a family.

When struggling with the adjustment period, it can help to acknowledge the feeling and also acknowledge that it's likely temporary.

Post-Breakup Loneliness

The process of breaking up can sometimes be compared to the death of a loved one.

  • Remember that time will help ease the pain.
  • Keeping busy can help. 
  • Do not isolate yourself— even if you feel lower than low. Lean on family and friends.
Loneliness Caused By Social Media
Social media can create a deep feeling of isolation.

Decrease your time on social media. Recognize it for what it may be, [which is] not necessarily reality. And work on creating bonds with friends, family, and partners.

New Baby Loneliness

While it can be an exciting and joyous time for some, others may feel very lonely and like they are going through this difficult transition all alone.

It's important for new parents to get out, or to have friends over so they can see other adults — and remember that they aren't alone. 

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RELATED IDEAS

Loneliness, What?

Everyone experiences loneliness at some time in their life. It could come after a divorce or a break up, or after moving to a new area, or when we have spent too much time on our own, whether that’s due to age, illness, or, as with the COVID-19 pandemic, social restrictions.

How to deal with loneliness - Headspace

headspace.com

A public health problem

Most people consider loneliness a personal problem to be figured out by individuals. 

However, a paper published in the American Journal of Public Health identified high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, disability, cognitive decline, and depression among the conditions affected by loneliness. What we have is a public health problem.

No emerging technology or drug exists on the horizon to cure loneliness. 

Understanding the Loneliness Epidemic

psychcentral.com

Ventilen, or “friend to one” in Danish, is an organization that helps 15-to-25-year-olds get together twice a week with two or three volunteers. Together, the people in the group play games, make meals, go to the cinema, and build human connections.

The world's happiest people have a beautifully simple way to tackle loneliness

qz.com

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