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4 Way to Stop Negative Self-Talk

Take a Break From Social Media

Studies show that social media increases self-criticism. Instead, spend some time paying attention to yourself and how you feel and see your life through your own eyes.

If you cannot be with yourself or speak to yourself respectfully, you shouldn’t expect others to. 

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

4 Way to Stop Negative Self-Talk

4 Way to Stop Negative Self-Talk

https://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-5866/4-Way-to-Stop-Negative-SelfTalk.html

mindbodygreen.com

4

Key Ideas

How You Should Talk To Yourself

Search your heart on how you want to speak with yourself and hence, feel about yourself. Your answer has to be affirmative (formulate your sentences using “do” instead of “don’t, ” etc. ), written in the first person, and in the present tense.

Take a Break From Social Media

Studies show that social media increases self-criticism. Instead, spend some time paying attention to yourself and how you feel and see your life through your own eyes.

If you cannot be with yourself or speak to yourself respectfully, you shouldn’t expect others to. 

Write Out The Insults You Say To Yourself

Seeing it on a piece of paper will make it more obvious to you how self-deprecating your thoughts really are.

Your thoughts run so swiftly, you may not register it if you’re not paying attention. Writing it allows you to slow down and see the absurdity in your own negative self-talk.

Treat Yourself Like A Friend

If you catch yourself on a self-deprecating rant, check in with yourself and ask, “Would I say this to _____? ” If the answer is “no, ” then you don’t deserve to be spoken to in that way either. Don’t let these insults pass without defending yourself against your own negative self-talk.

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Acknowledge The Negative Thoughts

You're not going to stop negative thoughts by ignoring them. 

You have to acknowledge them before you can confront them. It's not easy to admit you have doubts, that you are afraid or have reasons to be concerned, but you will never put them to rest in a meaningful way until you acknowledge them.

Consider The Cause

Take some time to consider where these negative thoughts come from and confront them. 

If you're afraid, assuage your fears. Chances are, they are only in your head. If you're experiencing self-doubt, tell yourself that everyone fails and the only way to prove to yourself that you can do this is to start working. Consider the roots of these thoughts so you can address them and work toward silencing them.

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Replace The Bad With Some Good

Take a negative thought and change it to something encouraging that's also accurate. Repeat until you find yourself needing to do it less and less often. 

Notice And Stop That Thought

Simply stopping negative thoughts in their tracks can be helpful. This is known as "thought-stopping" and can take the form of snapping a rubber band on your wrist, visualizing a stop sign, or simply changing to another thought when a negative train of thought enters your mind.

Say It Out Loud

Telling a trusted friend what you're thinking about can often lead to support or a good laugh when the negative self-talk is ridiculous. Even saying some negative self-talk phrases under your breath can remind you how unreasonable and unrealistic they sound, and remind you to give yourself a break.

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Replace Self-Criticism

Our brains automatically look for evidence that matches up with what we believe about ourselves, but often disregards other evidence to the contrary.

To break this automatic tendency, ...

Talk Back

Talking back to your inner critic is an important part of taking away its power. 

Telling the critic you don’t want to hear what it has to say begins to give you a sense of choice in the matter. 

Separate The Critic From You

Self-criticism isn’t innate to us, it’s internalized based on outside influences, such as other people’s criticism, expectations, or standards. It’s a habit that can be unlearned or controlled.

One way to separate yourself from the self-criticism is to give it a name. Doing so, you better positioned to free yourself from its influence.

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Narrative Habits

The way we talk to ourselves about the events in our lives is subject to the same laws of learning and habit formation that physical behaviors are.

That means we can learn to talk to o...

Events + Thoughts = Emotions

Our emotions are always mediated by some form of thinking. 

If our thoughts determine how we feel, that means how we habitually think will determine how we habitually feel.

Mind Reading

It happens when we assume we understand what other people are thinking without any real evidence.

It is a failure of imagination because we often only imagine and focus on the negative aspects.

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Consider Finding a Therapist

It’s important to know that if your negative thoughts are persistent — impacting your quality of life and functioning — it could be a sign of something more serious. Consult a therapist or psych...

Keep a Journal

Journaling can be great for getting stuff off your chest and to become more self-aware. Often, we are unaware of our negative thoughts and miss the chance of challenging them — but writing regularly can help with that.

You can create a two-column journal. In the first column, keep notes on any self-criticism that comes up throughout the day. Later, rewrite the first column in more empowering or positive ways to reframe it.

Learn How To Take a Step Back

If you’re beating yourself up over something, picture someone that you love in your shoes and think what would you say or do to support them. This allows you to take a step back and practice a little self-compassion, it can help to keep things in perspective.

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Emotions

They are basal responses that begin in the subcortical areas of the brain responsible for producing biochemical reactions to environmental stimuli that have a direct impact on our physical state.&n...

Feelings

Feelings are preceded by emotions and tend to be our reactions to them. Emotions are a more generalized experience across humans, but feelings are more subjective and influenced by our personal experiences and interpretations, thus they are harder to measure.

Negative Emotions

They can be defined as unpleasant or unhappy emotions evoked in individuals to express a negative effect towards something.

Although some are labeled negative, all emotions are normal to the human experience. And it’s important to understand when and why negative emotions might arise, and develop positive behaviors to address them.

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Self-criticism

It compromises your goals and undermines your pursuits, whether they are academic, health related, personal, or professional.

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  • Competitive work environments: If you work in a culture that demands perfection, you’ll probably start demanding perfection.
  • Pride and personality: Some persons have personalities that are naturally susceptible to perfectionism.
  • Fear of failure: People identify with their failure. They will strive for perfection as self-preservation.

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