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Ex-Googlers: You're emailing wrong and it's killing your productivity

Don’t rely on your willpower

For those with less restraint, consider an app that will prevent you from checking your email at unscheduled times.

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Ex-Googlers: You're emailing wrong and it's killing your productivity

Ex-Googlers: You're emailing wrong and it's killing your productivity

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/09/27/knapp-zeratsky-ex-google-employees-share-quick-tips-to-quit-bad-email-habits.html

cnbc.com

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Key Ideas

Email can wait

Unless your job demands otherwise, deal with email at the end of the day.

Less energy at the end of the day makes you less tempted to overcommit to incoming requests.

Schedule ‘email time’

With this strategy, you won’t waste time checking emails constantly throughout the day. 

Instead, you’ll establish an end-of-day email routine. Research found that people who check their emails three times a day respond to the same amount of emails 20 percent faster than those who constantly respond to messages as they came in.

Inbox zero can work

... if you’re just receiving several emails a day. Otherwise, strive to empty your inbox out once a week.

Emails are like snail mail

You do not need to constantly check and respond to every new email message.

Treat email like an old-fashioned paper letter that gets sent once a day.

Change your mindset

There’s no reason to treat emails like they are emergencies.

Try responding as slowly as you can get away with, be it hours, days or even weeks. If something is truly important, let people know to call or text.

Eventually, this practice will reset expectations.

Respect your time off

Most workplaces have an unreasonable expectation that you’ll check email during your time off.

During your vacation, act as if you’re off the grid.

Don’t rely on your willpower

For those with less restraint, consider an app that will prevent you from checking your email at unscheduled times.

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