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Decision Making Factors, Learn How We Make Decisions

Desire or Fear

When you consider your decisions, are you motivated by desire or fear?

  • If you are motivated by desire, you will tend to see the positive in every situation. You are motivated by goals and rewards.
  • If you are motivated by fear, you are motivated by something negative, like consequences for not doing something.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Decision Making Factors, Learn How We Make Decisions

Decision Making Factors, Learn How We Make Decisions

https://www.tonyrobbins.com/stories/unleash-the-power/5-factors-decisions/

tonyrobbins.com

5

Key Ideas

Internal or External

When you consider making a decision, who do you turn to?

  • If you seek your point of reference internally, you will make the decision for yourself.
  • If you seek your point of reference externally, you will reach out to people for their feedback and validation.

Possibility or Necessity

What drives you in your work?

  • If you are a possibilities person, you focus on the possible choices in a situation. You are likely curious about the potential your job has for growth.
  • If you are a necessity person, you are content not to think outside the box. You prefer being shown what to do and enjoy knowing how to do your tasks well.

Matcher or Mismatcher

Where do you prefer to direct your focus?

  • As a matcher, you will focus on similarities and how they relate to something new.
  • You're a mismatcher if you focus on the differences and find counterexamples to the decision you are facing.

General or Specific View

Some people are motivated by the big picture, while others are driven by the details.

  • If you like to focus on the broad picture, you will consider how your decisions will affect the future. 
  • If you have a specific view, you will be concerned with the details without necessarily considering how they fit into the larger scheme of things.

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Pay Attention To Your Emotions

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Internal and external frames of reference
  • When trying to communicate effectively with someone who has an internal frame of reference, appeal to the things they know about themselves. Tie your communication to a personal fact you already know about that person.
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