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The 10 Golden Rules of Effective Management

Be Consistent

You must reward the same behaviors every time they appear, discourage the same behaviors when they appear and treat every member of your team with an equal, level-headed view.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

The 10 Golden Rules of Effective Management

The 10 Golden Rules of Effective Management

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/254547

entrepreneur.com

10

Key Ideas

Be Consistent

You must reward the same behaviors every time they appear, discourage the same behaviors when they appear and treat every member of your team with an equal, level-headed view.

Communicate Properly

How you communicate with your team can dictate your eventual success. To avoid miscommunication and to keep your team updated, always strive for clarity, accuracy, and thoroughness on your communication.

Aim To Work as a Team

Have your team work for something together.

Setting goals just for the department or one individual breeds isolation and a limited mentality. Instead, give staffers a unified focus and purpose, to inspire them together.

Publicly Recognize Hard Work

Reward members of your team that do something exceptional, even if it’s just a vocal recognition. Do this publicly so the recipient feels good and the rest of the team knows that hard work is rewarded.

Just be careful to be consistent in your rewards so you won't be seen as playing favorites.

Be The Example

Set an example in terms of your behavior. Strive to be your own ideal of the perfect worker, especially in front of the team.

Never Go With 'One-Size-Fits-All.'

Your team is comprised of individuals with unique personalities and capabilities, so individualized approaches work better. Never use the exact same approach to motivate, encourage or mold all of them. 

Be as Transparent as Possible

Transparency shows your integrity as a leader and builds trust with the members of your team. Lying or withholding information, could jeopardize your relationships and the respect you command as a leader.

Encourage All Opinions

  • The more people you have actively participating in discussions and attempting to make improvements to the organization, the better.
  • Never chastise a team member for voicing an opinion respectfully -- even if it goes against your original vision or isn’t well thought out. 
  • Don’t cut someone down for voicing an opinion, it builds resentment and discourages people from sharing their own new thoughts.

Help People Enjoy Work

You don’t need a pool table or dress code abolition to make work fun. You can make the workday more enjoyable with things like surprise lunch outings, a dedicated break room or even just casual conversations with your workers.

Help your people enjoy coming to work, and they’ll do their best work for you.

Listen And Ask Questions

Don’t silence those who disagree with your management style or don’t like the direction of the company. Listen. And ask questions of your entire team.

Open dialogue makes it easier to proactively identify problems and work together to create a mutually beneficial environment. It will also make your employees feel appreciated and acknowledged.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The concept of servant leadership
The actual term for a leader who upends the power pyramid to put others' needs first was introduced by Robert Greenleaf in his influential 1970 essay "The Servant As Leader" in 1970.
The 6 main principles of servant leadership
  1. Empathy. Give trusted co-workers the benefit of the doubt by assuming the good in them. It goes a long way toward instilling loyalty and trust in you from your team.
  2. Awareness. Care deeply about the welfare of the team members. Don't view them only as cogs in a machine.
  3. Building community. Build community where both employees and customers can thrive.
  4. Persuasion. Rely on persuasion rather than coercion to create internal motivation required to complete the task effectively.
  5. Conceptualization. Servant-leading entrepreneurs focus on the big picture and don't get overly distracted by daily operations and short-term goals.
  6. Growth. Care passionately about the personal and professional growth of each member of the team.
Don't waste valuable energy
Don't waste valuable energy

We can't waste valuable energy on mindless activities while putting off what matters most for later.

In business, wasting energy means working on low-value tasks, and thinking b...

Cut out the optional

Being overwhelmed may be the new normal, but taking on too many responsibilities may be watering down our overall impact.

Bring back your focus to what matters most. Work on the projects that are the real game-changers. Delegate the discretionary work and eliminate unnecessary meetings.

Design an action plan

Running a thriving business means understanding how to organize your work by importance and knowing when to delegate.

  • Find your sweet spot. When you consider taking on a project, see if it aligns with your purpose and the organization's broader goals. Ask yourself if you're the right person with the right skillset.
  • Automate. As your company grows, use automation tools for low-level work. It also allows your employees to make more meaningful contributions.
  • Set boundaries. Learn to say no to low-level tasks. Set your own limits about what you'll take on.

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Introduce some greenery

One study found that workers in spaces with plants showed a 15 % higher productivity compared to those in plain...

Show appreciation

Creating motivation and making your team feel appreciated is a critical part of long-term productivity.

Encourage your team to keep gratitude journals - writing down a couple of sentences about what you are currently grateful for a couple of times a week. This practice improves productivity by increasing happiness.

Create some privacy

If people can't focus on their work, they are less effective in areas like collaboration and learning, and they are less likely to be satisfied with their jobs.

Workplaces with a balance between individual focus and collaboration are more innovative, creative and encouraging.

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Steve Job's effectiveness boiled down to this:

He inspired team members first so that they were driven to live up to his exacting standards when the situation called for it.

Get this equation backwards and you will wonder why&...

The formula for being an inspirational driver
  • Know your "noble cause." Jobs understood that if teams don’t find their work meaningful, they perceive challenging directives from a leader as arbitrary demands rather than a call to sacrifice for a higher purpose.
  • Tell your story early and often. If you can’t weave your ideas into a clear, compelling story, those ideas remain abstract words likely to be forgotten.
  • Push, but within boundaries. Make sure you have a clear end point and time line in mind before you go into "push" mode. Intense work with no clear end in sight is demoralizing.
Questions To Help You Delegate
  • As a manager, what tasks am I doing that I was doing before my promotion?
  • What tasks would I delegate to a member of an ideal team?
  • What team members have the capacity to learn...
Effects Of Stress In The Workplace
  • Poor physical health
  • Personal avoidance
  • A decrease in information sharing
  • Bad mouthing the company
  • Quitting
  • Excessive defensiveness
  • Social conflicts 
How To Decrease a Manager’s Stress
  • Being vulnerable
  • Delegating
  • Having clear goals and evaluation parameters
Embrace conflict

Don’t avoid conflict or pretend nothing has happened as it usually will only get worse.

  • If you notice a conflict between employees, encourage them to work it out.
  • If a ...
Resolving conflict
  • Talk together. Each person should have adequate time to say what he or she believes the other party needs to hear. 
  • Listen carefully to gain understanding. Give your complete attention to the person who is talking without interrupting. 
  • Resolution is possible only when you find points of agreement
  • Guide the conversation without taking sides. 
  • Be quick to forgive. Every conflict needs a clear resolution that acknowledges hurt feelings and finds a solution that begins to mend them.

Segmenting your day

This is an essential aspect  of successfully preparing for your day: you separate your actions into small chunks and focus only on the mini-goals of each segment.

The alternative is...

Leverage the power of systems

Probably the most influential step you can take toward creating a consistent practice of success is to invest in the systems that make your life run like a well-oiled machine.

Systems allow you to leverage your and other people’s time.

Ask for help

We all plateau. It’s frustrating but also a normal part of life. The key to bursting through ceilings, be they mental, physical or financial, is to hold yourself accountable. That doesn't mean accountable for doing it all, but accountable for getting help.

You’ll be surprised by how much further and faster a little help can take you. 

7 Rules of Success
  • Do what you love. Passion is everything.
  • Put a dent in the universe. Jobs believed in the power of vision. Don't lose sight of the big vision.
  • M...
Fuel growth while managing uncertainty
Fuel growth while managing uncertainty
  • Prepare for multiple outcomes that are within your control.
  • Refine your business plan. Adjust your strategies to your business’s current situation so you can u...
Innovation in business

The idea of innovation is taking off just as fast as the businesses that embrace it.

But, not all companies are prepared to push innovation within their organizations. Changing workplace s...

Intrapreneurship

An intrapreneur can be defined as someone who thinks like an entrepreneur but brings their ideas to the company where they are employed instead of launching their own business. 

Instate a "no idea is a bad idea" policy, gather the support your employees need to try out their ideas and let them pitch decision-makers at your company.

McKnight’s 15-percent-time rule

This allows employees to spend 15 % of their paid work time daydreaming, doodling or experimenting with ideas that don’t necessarily have to do with their work at the company.

This kind of daydreaming is the genesis of invention and fosters passion for one’s work.

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