The Directly Responsible Individual - Deepstash

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Two Things to Do After Every Meeting

The Directly Responsible Individual

Steve Jobs insisted that all the items on a meeting agenda have a designated person responsible for that task and any follow-up work that happened.

Public accountability works, because it ensures that a project or task actually gets done.

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Negative People

Negative people want to bring you down. They rarely contribute, cannot accept you, and consistently work to hurt, belittle or suck away your motivation.

Regardless of your accomplishme...

Negative News

Negative news will slowly bring you down, eventually draining your energy and leaving you unmotivated.

Try to keep your distance from people who complain a lot and from media that promotes negative news.

Fear Of Failure

Many see failure as proof that our effort meant nothing. But failure is a feedback system and gives you the opportunity to fix things, reflect, and grow for the next time.

When you fail, take a step back, look at the events that led to it, try to find the lesson in the failure and act upon it.

Be selective

When you start on a project, make sure it is something you are passionate about and you want to see through.

If you aren’t sure that this is something you really want to do, try it out on a s...

Estimate the resources you need

It doesn’t have to be exhaustive. Just a quick outline will help. The point is to have something that guides you.

Do a quick plan on how much time and effort this idea will take, so you can have a bird’s eye view.

Budget your time and energy

Good planning of resources help you plan out your energy and expectations. 

So plan out your time and resources accordingly and integrate them into your schedule/to-do list. Block out time in your calendar for the project. Give yourself some buffer as well, in case of contingencies.

Getting Things Done: the basics
  • Capture. Write down everything you need to do.
  • Clarify. Break down each task into an actionable next step. 
  • Organize. Move each of those actionable ta...
The 2-minute rule
If a task takes less than 2 minutes, then do it now.

If the effort to keep remembering a task is more than just getting it out of the way now, then do it.

Fixing small tasks
  • Fixing things is empowering. Our confidence increases or decreases based on our ability to make progress. 
  • Any progress builds momentum (and your mood): No matter how small the task is, crossing it off your to-do list gives you a boost of momentum and enhances your mood.
  • Small steps turn into habits: When a task is easy to do and quickly completed, it’s much easier to turn it into a habit.