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Two Things to Do After Every Meeting

https://hbr.org/2015/11/two-things-to-do-after-every-meeting

hbr.org

Two Things to Do After Every Meeting
Steve Jobs insisted that every item on a meeting agenda have a designated person responsible for that task and any follow-up work that happened. He called that person the DRI-the Directly Responsible Individual. He knew the public accountability would ensure that a project or task would actually get done, and he wanted to set clear, organized instructions for his team to follow.

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The Directly Responsible Individual

Steve Jobs insisted that all the items on a meeting agenda have a designated person responsible for that task and any follow-up work that happened.

Public accountability works, because it ensures that a project or task actually gets done.

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When Momentum Disappears

Why the productive conversations in a meeting seemingly go nowhere:

  • Participants are most likely immediately running to another meeting where their attention shifts to a new set of issues. 
  • Participants leave the meeting without clarity about what was agreed upon.

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To Do After Every Meeting

After and in between meetings, quickly send out clear and concise meeting notes and follow up on the commitments made.

  • If you don’t capture the conversation and put it into a form that can be easily retrieved later, the thinking and the agreements can be lost.
  • Persistence is a key influence skill. If you want anything to happen, you must follow up.

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Meeting Notes Are Useful

They help inform people who weren’t there about what happened and remind those who were there about what agreements they made. 

Use them as a tool to keep everyone on the same page and focused on what you all need to get done before you meet next.

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  • Clarify commitments in writing at the end of every meeting.
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