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3 Ways To Make Decisions You Can Stand By Forever

Self-imposed deadlines

When faced with a difficult decision, set a date or time for you to come to a conclusion. Doing this forces a habit of self-trust.

You will be right sometimes, and other times you'll be wrong. However, making a decision is more important than waiting for an outside force to decide for you.

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3 Ways To Make Decisions You Can Stand By Forever

3 Ways To Make Decisions You Can Stand By Forever

https://medium.com/swlh/3-ways-to-make-decisions-you-can-stand-by-forever-207f49ca86cf

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Key Ideas

Self-imposed deadlines

When faced with a difficult decision, set a date or time for you to come to a conclusion. Doing this forces a habit of self-trust.

You will be right sometimes, and other times you'll be wrong. However, making a decision is more important than waiting for an outside force to decide for you.

Perfect is not the goal

Many mediocre business people become successful just because they get things done.

Being smart or well-positioned or creative helps, but only second to progress - the ability to move from point A to point B to point C.

Empowering people

One of the root causes of analysis paralysis is that CEOs and founders built their organization to depend upon them. As a leader, your responsibility is not to make every decision yourself, but to create systems and a culture that empowers people to make educated decisions on their own.

Ask yourself how you can instil the same level of self-trust in those around you.

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Schedule Your Thinking Time

To avoid thinking about problems all day long, schedule a specific time where you give yourself the freedom to think about the issue you need to make a decision about. 

If thoughts about the issue creep into your brain before your scheduled thinking time, tell yourself “No, I’m going to think about that after dinner, not during this meeting”.

Problem Solving vs. Worrying

Dwelling on a problem, thinking “this is horrible, I can’t handle this” or rehashing things that happened in the past are an unproductive use of your time.

Thinking about what steps you can take to improve the situation or actively thinking of a solution to the problem are helpful toward moving forward. 

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Decision fatigue

Our ability to perform mental tasks and make decisions wears thin when it’s repeatedly used.

Identify the most important decisions you need to make, and, as often as possible, prioritize your time so that you make them when your energy levels are highest.

A steady state of distraction

Our brains process five times as much information today as in 1986. Thus, many of us live in a continuous state of distraction and struggle to focus. 

To counter this, find time each day to unplug and step back from email, social media and news.

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Paradox of Choice
Paradox of Choice
It means that while increased choice allows us to achieve objectively better results, it also leads to greater anxiety, indecision, paralysis, and dissatisfaction.
Overthinking lowers your performance

Our working memory is what allows us to focus on the information we need to get things done at the moment we’re doing them. It is also in limited supply. You can think of it like our brain’s computer memory. Once it’s used up, nothing more can fit in.

When you overanalyze a situation, the repetitive thoughts, anxiety, and self-doubt decrease the amount of working memory you have available to complete challenging tasks, causing your productivity to plummet.

Overthinking kills your creativity

A recent Stanford study suggests that over-thinking not only impedes our ability to perform cognitive tasks but keeps us from reaching our creative potential as well.

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