Time for yourself - Deepstash

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8 Ways to Be Kinder to Yourself in 2020

Time for yourself

According to experts, choosing to spend time by yourself can help your social relationships. Solitude can also help you regulate your emotions. It can have a calming effect that prepares you to better engage with others.

Learn to identify moments when you need solitude to recharge and reflect to help with negative emotions and experiences.

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Minimizing The Brain Drain Caused By Your Devices
  • Whether you are using it or not, be aware of how much of your conscious thoughts are occupied by your devices.
  • Take your devices out of your sight and keep it so while you need to be productive.
  • Take notes by hand if possible. Studies show that writing by hand increases learning.
  • Don’t give up. Reducing the use of devices is hard and takes time.
Phones And The Human Brain

Phones take over many duties in our day-to-day lives and so they occupy portions of our attentional capacity.

Studies indicate that regular phone and computer users that physically get away from devices, theirs or not, have an increase in available cognitive capacity and that doing so is the best way to make sure you won’t have anxiety over whatever you might be missing on it.

Maximization

Also known as Fear of Better Options (F.O.B.O.), is the relentless researching of all possible options for fear that you’ll miss out on the “best” one.

Though maximizers tend to make better decisions, they are less satisfied with those decisions than are people who make quicker ones based on less research. 

Mostly Fine Decision (MFD)

Your M.F.D. is the minimum outcome you’re willing to accept for a decision.

It’s the outcome you’d be fine with, even if it’s not the absolute best possibility.

Self-imposed solitude

Solitude can be invaluable and rewarding.

Moments of solitude – even small ones – when self-imposed, intentional, and fully appreciated, can have profound effects on our productivity and creative thinking.

Undercover Introverts

One in every two or three people is an introvert – preferring quiet alone time to stimulation and large groups of people.

Stepping away from the routine and rowdiness of our daily lives allows us to connect ideas in new ways, follow creative impulses, and simply think about one thing at a time.

Creativity And Efficiency Need Solitude

Being alone is uncomfortable at times. But when it comes to creative work and thinking, it’s important to take a long-term view on those moments of discomfort. 

Being alone has a kind of a rebound effect. It’s like bitter medicine, creating more positive emotions and less self-reported depression down the line.