8 Ways to Be Kinder to Yourself in 2020 - Deepstash

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8 Ways to Be Kinder to Yourself in 2020

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/12/24/smarter-living/8-ways-to-be-kinder-to-yourself-in-2020.html

nytimes.com

8 Ways to Be Kinder to Yourself in 2020
You deserve it! Welcome to the Smarter Living newsletter! Every Monday, S.L. editor Tim Herrera emails readers with tips and advice for living a better, more fulfilling life. Sign up here to get it in your inbox. Happy 2020! Are you exhausted yet?

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Time for yourself

According to experts, choosing to spend time by yourself can help your social relationships. Solitude can also help you regulate your emotions. It can have a calming effect that prepares you to better engage with others.

Learn to identify moments when you need solitude to recharge and reflect to help with negative emotions and experiences.

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Take time to be idle

Being overly busy with long to-do lists has become a way to communicate status. Although being busy is not a real status indicator, the impact is real and it contributes to burnout, anxiety and stress-related diseases.

Doing nothing can be a great productivity tool for recharging.

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Casual friendships

Having weak ties (neighbors, your favorite bartender, or fellow members in a spin class) can have a positive impact on our well-being by helping us feel more connected to other social groups.

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Worry doesn't help

Worrying about when something will go wrong will only steal your current joy. Accept that you can't perfectly prepare for potential challenges.

Researchers found students who predicted getting a poor grade on an exam felt bad for days before receiving their results. The stressing, however, didn't diminish the disappointment they felt once they got their scores.

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‘Guilty’ pleasures

Guilty pleasures, like junk food or trashy books, can be good for us, as long as we enjoy them in moderation.

Take a mental break and enjoy doing something that doesn't require intense intellectual focus. It will improve your ability to deal with stressors productively.

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Accept compliments

Getting credit for your work gives your brain good feelings and helps you accomplish more.

The psychological impact of keeping a positive view of your accomplishments can decrease stress and encourage better habits.

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Repeating experiences

Doing something only once may leave you naive to the missed nuances remaining to enjoy.

Experience has many layers of information to reveal. It's probably a good idea to repeat it.

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From regret to self-improvement

Research shows that ignoring upsetting feelings can reduce your capacity for joy and may manifest as physical pain.

Acknowledge the bad experience. Notice your thoughts and sensations. Relax your face and hands, and accept how you feel knowing that you won't feel this way forever. Draw out a lesson you can apply to future situations.

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