Changing our model of heroism - Deepstash

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The time has come to change our model of heroism

Changing our model of heroism

A hero is no longer a mythical classification or a few legendary men or women.

Being a hero becomes a way of life. It is not about the occasional heroic act, but about daily dignity.

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Continued comparisons

One study manipulated what characters looked like and measured audience perceptions. They hoped to find out if simple differences in appearance would be enough for viewers to perceive a character as a hero or villain.

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When an audience sees the evolution of a character whose ethics progressively spiral downward, they don't turn against the character. Instead, they remain loyal to him. especially when the antagonists concurrently get worse with the villain.

It's likely the result of a constant comparison with other characters. It shows the importance of how characters are framed.