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Do you consider yourself a leader or a manager? Here's why both are critical to your bottom line | The JotForm Blog

Managers vs. leaders

While managers' objectives include providing a more stable organization of the enterprise as a whole, leaders are more driven by the idea of setting new and challenging directions, that could take the company to a higher level and have employees feel more motivated and inspired.

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Do you consider yourself a leader or a manager? Here's why both are critical to your bottom line | The JotForm Blog

Do you consider yourself a leader or a manager? Here's why both are critical to your bottom line | The JotForm Blog

https://www.jotform.com/blog/leader-and-manager/

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Key Ideas

Managers vs. leaders

While managers' objectives include providing a more stable organization of the enterprise as a whole, leaders are more driven by the idea of setting new and challenging directions, that could take the company to a higher level and have employees feel more motivated and inspired.

Overconfident leaders

Nowadays, we tend to believe that individuals showing too great self-confidence behave this way mainly because they are more qualified than others to get a leadership position. 

However, it is often soon afterwards that we come to realize that those very same persons are not competent enough, but only rather narcissistic.

A successful leader

Successful leaders do not only have to work hard, but they should also bear in mind the importance that a motivated team can have in the company's growth. 

Moreover, enterprises that encourage the development of their own young employees to positions of leadership get to know profit for longer periods of time.

A leader's top qualities

Among a leader's top qualities, one can note down the following: honesty, communication, commitment, positive attitude, and ability to inspire.

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Workers feel anxious on how their bosses think about them. Should I correct my boss? Does he think of me as a competitor? Am I capable enough? Should I take an action?

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Separate reflection from real work

Companies face a challenge when it comes to planning the program's curriculum.  Adults typically retain only 10 percent of what they hear in classroom lectures, but nearly two-thirds when they learn by doing. 

The answer seems straightforward: tie leadership development to real on-the-job projects. While it is not easy to create opportunities that simultaneously address high-priority needs, companies should strive to make every major business project a leadership-development opportunity as well.

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Characteristics Of Authentic Leaders
  • Rejecting the idea of adopting a different persona.
  • Being self-aware and knowing their strengths and weaknesses.
  • Focusing on delivering results, particularly in the long t...
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An authentic leader inspires trust and loyalty in employees and has the ability to influence others and contribute to an organization's success. And all that can be learned and assessed.

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Critics also say that authentic leadership's belief in presenting one's true self, and not a persona, can prevent someone from being an effective leader. 

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  • It draws people to you. If you want others to follow you, you can start by smiling...
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  • Confront reality
  • Practice accountability
  • Talk straight
  • Right wrongs
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A leader who listens is open and accountable: he can filter out criticism or drama and find the facts in order to respond appropriately. 

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Narcissistic individuals

We've always admired famous people, but our admiration for people who admire themselves is on the rise. But true leaders keep their narcissism in check.

Popular advice focuses on loving yourself above all else. And this creates leaders who are unaware of their limitations. They see leadership as an entitlement. 

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  • Do not overestimate your own competency. Life experience alone is not enough to become a diversity expert.
  • Broaden students’ perspective on privilege. A broad spectrum of topics that can reveal differences.
  • Demonstrate authenticity — and grace. Making cultural faux pas is an opportunity for teaching and showing grace.

  • Focus on solutions.  Awareness encourages motivation toward solutions.

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Inspiration alone is not enough

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Inspiring leaders

The leaders that inspire are those who use a personal combination of strengths to motivate individuals and teams to take on bold missions and to hold them accountable for results.

And they unlock higher performance through empowerment, not thorough command and control.

Becoming an Inspiring Leader
  • You only need centeredness: a state of mindfulness that enables leaders to remain calm under stress, empathize, listen deeply, and remain present.
  • Your key strength has to match how your organization creates value.
  • You have to behave differently if you want your employees to do so.
Peter Drucker

"Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things."

Peter Drucker
Change Leadership Styles

Sometimes a teammate needs a warm hug. Sometimes the team needs a visionary, a new style of coaching, someone to lead the way or even, on occasion, a kick in the bike shorts. 

For that reason, great leaders choose their leadership style like a golfer chooses his or her club, with a calculated analysis of the matter at hand, the end goal and the best tool for the job.

Daniel Goleman’s leadership styles
  1. Pacesetting leader - “Do as I do, now”: expects and models excellence and self-direction. 
  2. Authoritative leader - “Come with me”: mobilizes the team toward a common vision.
  3. Affiliative leader - “People come first”:  works to create emotional bonds that bring a feeling of belonging.
  4. Coaching leader - "Try this": develops people for the future.
  5. Coercive leader - “Do what I tell you”: demands immediate compliance.
  6. Democratic leader - “What do you think?": builds consensus through participation.