Tips to make Niksen effective - Deepstash

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The Case for Doing Nothing

Tips to make Niksen effective

In order to keep your effectiveness high while doing nothing, you might want to consider the following tips: 

  • Find the good moments to take breaks throughout your day, in order to later be more productive.
  • Own the very fact of doing nothing.
  • Take your time getting used to doing nothing.
  • Adjust your environment so that it favors Niksen.
  • Get bored in original ways. All in all, figure out what works for you and make sure you do nothing once in a while, as it is so beneficial for your health.

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