The Flynn effect and its importance - Deepstash

The Flynn effect and its importance

The take-away taught by the discovery of the Flynn effect refers to the fact that the IQ is not something natural. Furthermore, the IQ can and has been shaped by the different environments and, mostly, by our education.

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The Flynn effect

Back in the '80s, researcher James Flynn made a discovery that is now known as the Flynn effect. According to the researcher, the scores in IQ tests have known an increase in the past century.

The Flynn effect tells us that the human mind is much more adaptable and malleable than we might have thought. It seems that some of our thinking patterns aren't necessarily innate, but rather things that we learn from our environment.

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Researchers have come to explain the Flynn effect by means of the differences between centuries. Therefore, improvements in health and nutrition, as well as social changes, such as new mental habits, more demanding jobs or a more complex entertainment, are reasons that have led to the apparition of the effect.

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There is no standard definition of intelligence

Present approaches suggest that intelligence means having the capacity to:

  • Learn from experience: this relates to the acquisition, retention, and use of knowledge.
  • Identify problems: to use your knowledge, you should have the ability to identify possible problems that need to be approached and solved.
  • Solve problems: you need to be able to use what you have learned to come up with a proper solution to the problems you have identified.

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Fluid vs. Crystallized intelligence

In the intelligence field, there is a distinction between:

  •  "fluid" intelligence (indexed by tests of abstract reasoning and pattern detection);
  •  "crystallized" intelligence (indexed by measures of vocabulary and general knowledge).

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Worrying Constantly turns to Depression

We are generally advised to do self-reflection and examine our lives, but we may not be doing it right.

Rumination, the process of recurrent worrying or brooding, is the default process of the brain but can lead to impaired decision making and even depression.

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