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An Introduction to the Flynn Effect

The Flynn effect and its importance

The take-away taught by the discovery of the Flynn effect refers to the fact that the IQ is not something natural. Furthermore, the IQ can and has been shaped by the different environments and, mostly, by our education.

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An Introduction to the Flynn Effect

An Introduction to the Flynn Effect

https://www.thoughtco.com/an-introduction-to-the-flynn-effect-4159830

thoughtco.com

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Key Ideas

The Flynn effect

Back in the '80s, researcher James Flynn made a discovery that is now known as the Flynn effect. According to the researcher, the scores in IQ tests have known an increase in the past century.

The Flynn effect tells us that the human mind is much more adaptable and malleable than we might have thought. It seems that some of our thinking patterns aren't necessarily innate, but rather things that we learn from our environment.

The explanation of the Flynn effect

Researchers have come to explain the Flynn effect by means of the differences between centuries. Therefore, improvements in health and nutrition, as well as social changes, such as new mental habits, more demanding jobs or a more complex entertainment, are reasons that have led to the apparition of the effect.

The Flynn effect and its importance

The take-away taught by the discovery of the Flynn effect refers to the fact that the IQ is not something natural. Furthermore, the IQ can and has been shaped by the different environments and, mostly, by our education.

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