Consuming artificial sweeteners - Deepstash

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Artificial sweeteners: sugar-free, but at what cost? - Harvard Health Blog

Consuming artificial sweeteners

The moderate consumption of artificial sweeteners can lead to weight loss as well as to less chances of getting a cancer. However, there are a few risks that one should take into account when consuming these products, such as metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. The safest option would be to consume foods that contain sugar in their natural form, as whole fruit and as few as possible artificial sweeteners and sugar itself.

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Sugar Substitute
Sugar Substitute

Stevia, a sugar substitute, is generally regarded as safe by health and food safety organizations. The studies that they rely on are industry-funded, so we have to take their take on this artificia...

Artificial Sweetener Stevia

Though Stevia is 300 to 400 times sweeter than sugar, the Center of Science in the Public Interest, which is a food advocacy group, considers it safer than other substitutes and artificial sweeteners.

Many products club Stevia with other sugar alcohols like erythritol, which can cause digestive complications.

Long Term Usage of Nonnutritive Sweeteners

It can cause metabolic effects, and may not be helpful for weight loss.

Sweeteners are also associated with obesity, diabetes and heart disease, apart from affecting our gut microbes.

The Paleo Diet
The Paleo Diet

The basic concept of the paleo diet is to eat whole foods and avoid processed foods.

Studies suggest that this diet can lead to significant weight loss and major improveme...

A general guideline

There is no one "right" way to eat for everyone.

Some eat a low-carb diet high in animal foods, while others follow a high-carb diet with lots of plants.

Avoid these foods and ingredients:

  • Sugar and high-fructose corn syrup.
  • All Grains.
  • Legumes like beans and lentils.
  • Most Dairy, especially low-fat dairy.
  • Some vegetable oils like soybean, sunflower, cottonseed, corn, grapeseed, safflower and other oils.
  • Trans fats: "hydrogenated" or "partially hydrogenated" oils found in margarine and various processed foods.
  • Artificial sweeteners: Aspartame, sucralose, cyclamates, saccharin, acesulfame potassium. 
  • Highly processed foods: Everything labeled "diet" or "low-fat" or that has many additives.
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Sugar activates the brain's reward system that releases feel-good hormones. Too much sugar too frequently will hijack this reward system and will cause a loss of control, cravings and increased tol...

Sugar slows the brain down

A diet high in sugar makes learning difficult by slowing the brain down. Overconsumption of sugar damages synaptic activity in the brain.

When you consume too much sugar, you could develop resistance to insulin, the hormone responsible for regulating the function of brain cells. 

The sugar crash

When you eat too much sugar, your blood sugar levels peak and drop. This causes you to experience irritability, mood swings, brain fog, and fatigue. You may find yourself feeling anxious or depressed. Carb-laden foods create the same response.

Chronically high blood sugar levels are linked to inflammation in the brain, which may be a cause of depression.