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What Are You Working Towards? Because You Better Know

Ask the big questions

You have to take the time to ask the big questions:

  • What is your big goal?
  • Why is it your goal?
  • How will you get there?
  • Why do you think it is the path to your goal?

Hard things in life are not achieved through simple effort. It's insight that illuminates the road and strategy that gets us there.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

What Are You Working Towards? Because You Better Know

What Are You Working Towards? Because You Better Know

https://thoughtcatalog.com/ryan-holiday/2015/09/what-are-you-working-towards-because-you-better-know/

thoughtcatalog.com

4

Key Ideas

Purpose, not passion

There is a famous saying that translates: "One jumps into the fray and then figures it out."

Usually, some version of this strategy is that people don't take the time to spot their landing, nor do they think about what they're jumping off.

The alternative to a passion-driven mindset

The passion-driven mindset can be contrasted with an alternative: a poise-like discipline and a sense of purpose.

The key is to know what you're actually working towards. Ask yourself what your strategy is.

Working aimlessly

Few people take the time to find out what is possible or have the courage to probe themselves. It's unpleasant, and they'd instead figure it out as they go.

  • They network but don't know what kind of contacts would be helpful.
  • They want to write a book, but don't want to take the time to ask what purpose it serves.
  • They talk about what they'd like to do but have no idea how to get there or if they will enjoy it.

Instead of moving closer to the answer, they are stuck in endless reacting and reaction.

Ask the big questions

You have to take the time to ask the big questions:

  • What is your big goal?
  • Why is it your goal?
  • How will you get there?
  • Why do you think it is the path to your goal?

Hard things in life are not achieved through simple effort. It's insight that illuminates the road and strategy that gets us there.

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