Developing Meta-Cognition - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

deepstash

Beta

The Dunning-Kruger effect: you don't know what you don't know

Developing Meta-Cognition

Meta-cognitive skills are developed by:

  1. Self-reflection by journaling, along with a review of your progress and personal changes.
  2. Using second-level thinking by asking yourself about potential blind spots or missing information.
  3. Using mental models for testing your assumptions and separating the signal from the noise.
  4. Taking notes using an app or even pen and paper, trying to visualize your knowledge using diagrams and doodles.
  5. Being aware of the various cognitive biases that can cloud our thinking, and learning more about them.

Meta-cognition is the essential requirement to be able to gauge one’s competence or the lack of it.

166 SAVES

585 READS


EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Metacognition
Metacognition

Metacognition means “thinking about thinking” or “knowing about knowing.” The word “metacognition” means “above cognition”.

It’s translate into being aware of your own awar...

Components that make up metacognition
  • Metacognitive knowledge: What you know about yourself and others in terms of thinking and learning processes.
  • Metacognitive regulation: The methods you use to control your learning.
  • Metacognitive experiences: The thoughts and feelings you have during your learning process.
Metacognitive knowledge categories
  • Declarative knowledge: the knowledge you have about your learning style and about what the factors that influence you.
  • Procedural knowledge: what you know about learning in general - strategies you found or that you have already applied.
  • Conditional knowledge: it refers to knowing when and why you should use declarative and procedural knowledge.
Efficacy, effectiveness, efficiency
Efficacy, effectiveness, efficiency

These terms sound very similar and are often used interchangeably in everyday conversations.

  • Efficacy means getting stuff done. (Related question: Is it working?...
Efficacy: Getting stuff done

Efficacy is mostly used in a scientific setting. Efficacy is the ability to create an anticipated effect.

For example, a specific medication that improves a patient's symptoms in an ideal environment has demonstrated efficacy.

Effectiveness: Doing the right things

Efficacy is not always enough. Medication that improves a patient's symptoms under ideal conditions is technically getting things done, but not always the right things.

Effectiveness in clinical trials is about how well a treatment works in the real world, not just in perfectly controlled conditions.

Intentional Knowledge: Selective Ignorance
Intentional Knowledge: Selective Ignorance

Ignorance indeed is bliss, if practised selectively. News, people, topics, projects can drain a lot of our energy, and most of us seep into everything knowledgeable, thinking it’s ...

Too Much Information, Too Little Time

While our brain has about a million GB of space, the real limitation or constraint is the time and mental energy. We do not really know how much physical energy we require just to do some mental work.

We need to focus on selective information, actively deciding to not engage in junk news consumption, and other mentally draining activities, saving our mental bandwidth for things we want to focus on.

Selective Ignorance: Saying No To Stuff
  • Though we would like to, we cannot learn everything and do everything.
  • We need to be selective in our choices while consuming content from diverse sources, provided we find it enjoyable and worthwhile.
  • We have to say no to a thousand things to be able to focus on what truly matters and to cut out the noise.
  • Focusing selectively helps in removing distractions, reducing stress, and improving concentration.