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How to run a marathon (hint: it's all in the mind)

Association and dissociation

Association refers to the monitoring of the body and adjusting pace accordingly, while dissociation refers to using distraction to direct attention away from pain.

During a marathon, association and dissociation are important cognitive strategies for maintaining focus.

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How to run a marathon (hint: it's all in the mind)

How to run a marathon (hint: it's all in the mind)

https://theconversation.com/how-to-run-a-marathon-hint-its-all-in-the-mind-58033

theconversation.com

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Key Ideas

Failure to prepare is preparing to fail

When preparing for any marathon or long distance, not only is physical preparation important but it is also crucial to prepare mentally for the gruelling number of miles and the inevitable mental challenges. 

Hitting the wall

Hitting the wall is basically about running out of energy: Your legs feel like concrete, your breathing becomes laboured, your stride turns into a shuffle. Negative thoughts flood your mind, and the urge to quit becomes overwhelming. 

Hitting the wall isn’t just a fallacy, it’s probably going to happen to you at some point to you if you’re brave enough to be running the marathon.

Mentally preparing for a marathon

Identifying imaginary, but realistic scenarios before the race like “what happens when I hit the wall?” or “what if it rains?” and then identifying  potential strategies to cope with these situations should they arise on race day are the key to success on the actual day itself.

Mantras and self-talk to focus the mind

Runners report using a rich variety of motivational self-talk as well as spiritual self-talk and mantras. Repeating choice words whenever you need to focus can help direct your mind away from negative thoughts and toward a positive experience

Association and dissociation

Association refers to the monitoring of the body and adjusting pace accordingly, while dissociation refers to using distraction to direct attention away from pain.

During a marathon, association and dissociation are important cognitive strategies for maintaining focus.

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The legend

The term "marathon" came from the legend of Pheidippides, a Greek messenger. 

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Break down your run
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You can apply this concept to your goals. Break them down, so they don't seem so daunting. Tackle it each step at a time. And if you need to, take breaks in between. It's not the end of the world.

Prepare for the worst

It's important for us to be realistic sometimes as well. 

The better prepared you are, the higher the probability that you will "finish" your life's marathons.

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