Tips on Staying Positive - Deepstash

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Emotional Contagion: What It Is and How to Avoid It

Tips on Staying Positive

  • Surround yourself with things that make you happy
  • Send back positivity to others
  • Practice self-awareness to recognize what is happening in the present moment better
  • Laugh out loud
  • Try not to take things personally.

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