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Google’s surprising discovery about effective teams

5 characteristics of effective teams

  1. Psychological safety: team members feel safe to take risks and to be vulnerable in front of each other.
  2. Dependability: Team members get things done on time.
  3. Structure and Clarity: team members have clear roles, plans and goals.
  4. Meaning: work is personally important to team members.
  5. Impact: team members think their work matters and creates change.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Google’s surprising discovery about effective teams

Google’s surprising discovery about effective teams

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2015/12/googles-surprising-discovery-about-effective-teams/

weforum.org

2

Key Ideas

For a team to be high-performing...

...who is on a team matters less than how the team members interact, structure their work, and view their contributions.

5 characteristics of effective teams

  1. Psychological safety: team members feel safe to take risks and to be vulnerable in front of each other.
  2. Dependability: Team members get things done on time.
  3. Structure and Clarity: team members have clear roles, plans and goals.
  4. Meaning: work is personally important to team members.
  5. Impact: team members think their work matters and creates change.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Innovation

...comes with a relentless focus on experience and not being satisfied by “just getting it out.” You must take time to create a complete experience by taking your innovative idea and ruthlessly con...

Tips to help create an innovative culture

  • Engage and empower the entire team. Everyone in your organization should feel empowered to unleash his or her entrepreneurial spirit.
  • Suspend judgment. Identify “the good” in the ideas instead.
  • “Fail big, but fail soon.” Team members must also know that they have permission to fail.  Sometimes you must move quickly and you can’t always play it safe.
  • Set a good example. Take time to connect, mentor and develop your team members. Inspire them to create, look for new approaches and think outside the box.
  • Pay attention to the details. Designate specific goals, projects, times and expectations. These types of details ensure the innovation process doesn’t turn into a time suck.
  • Don’t forget about the physical environment. The physical environment people are in can influence how they feel, think and interact and can impact the quality and quantity in the innovation process.

Being A Great Listener

  • Focus on what’s being said instead of how it affects you or what you want to say.
  • Put away your phone. It’s rude and multitasking takes away from comprehension.

Listening influences up to 40% of a leader’s job performance

Beyond the spoken words, the tone of voice, body language, and what isn’t said also convey valuable information.

But most people overrate their listening skills. 

Alfred Brendel

Alfred Brendel

“The word listen contains the same letters as the word silent.”

Mind The Limitations Of Your Brain

Mind The Limitations Of Your Brain
  1. Decide important things early in the day, else decision fatigue sets in.
  2. Have snacks to keep your glucose high, else your brain will respond more strongly to immediate re...

Listen To Your Body

As reaction to panic or stress the body pumps adrenaline, making you breath faster and certain parts of the body feel tight, that makes us prone to often incorrect snap judgments. When having that kind of response, close your eyes, take a few breaths, and take some time to consider your next action.

That buys you time to physically calm down enough to make a more considered choice. 

Other Tips For Better Choices

  1. Be skeptic, meditate, learn from previous mistakes, know what the data and it’s context means, and trust your informed judgment.
  2. Focus on the quality of information you’re getting, not the quantity.
  3. Set a time limit for yourself, and ensure you’re not using your decision-making angst as a procrastination device.
  4. If you see that you prefer familiar and easier choices, ensure they aren’t being reframed to support something you wish was true.
  5. Crisp, clear decisions may seem like the best kind of decisions, but they may cost you time and extra effort when often the details may not even matter.
  6. Forcing yourself to choose may lead to you making high-risk decisions and ignoring alternatives.
  7. Imagine the effort you’re considering was a fantastic success, and then that it was an unequivocal disaster. Then, analyze the reasons for both to find blind spots, dampen excessive optimism, and bridge the gap between short-term and long-term thinking.