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4 Exercises to Help You Handle Anxiety, Fear, and Anger

Emotional Intelligence (EI)

Emotional Intelligence (EI)

The ability to recognize and appropriately react to feelings in yourself and the people around you, particularly when it comes to handling stress and frustration.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

4 Exercises to Help You Handle Anxiety, Fear, and Anger

4 Exercises to Help You Handle Anxiety, Fear, and Anger

https://www.inc.com/christina-desmarais/4-simple-ways-to-increase-your-emotional-intelligence.html

inc.com

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Key Ideas

4 Ways to build your emotional intelligence

  • Study yourself. Pay attention to your reactions and behaviours to get a better understanding of your emotional responses.
  • Manage emotions during stressful situations by breathing correctly. Breathe deep and steady through the nose with a relaxed ribcage to lower stress in the body.
  • Channel your emotions. Transform negative energies into positive ones by redirecting them to fuel new opportunities.

  • Transmute your emotions. Try to transform negative feelings such as anger, hatred, pain, and jealousy into positive ones such as love, admiration, compassion and kindness.

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Emotional Intelligence Matters
EQ is not only the ability to identify and manage your own emotions, but it’s also the ability to recognize the emotions of others.
Manage your negative emotions
When you’re able to manage and reduce your negative emotions, you’re less likely to get overwhelmed. 

If someone is upsetting you, don’t jump to conclusions. Instead, allow yourself to look at the situation in a variety of ways. Try to look at things objectively so you don’t get riled up as easily. 

Be mindful of your vocabulary

Emotionally intelligent people tend to use more specific words that can help communicate deficiencies, and then they immediately work to address them. 

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Anger and Aggression
  • Anger: An emotion felt when we believe we have been wronged.
  • Aggression: is an act of expression of the anger, by our words our actions. Aggression can be insults, sarcas...
Validation and Boundaries
  • We can try and validate the anger felt by an individual by making them know that their anger is maybe justified while putting firm but respectful boundaries on their aggression.
  • We then need to be clear about what type of aggression we are willing to tolerate, setting boundaries on the unacceptable.
  • We may have to put our foot down and be ready to leave the conversation or escalate the issue, without falling into the trap of guilt and emotion.
  • If possible, we need to restart the conversation when things have cooled down, and diffuse the issue in a calm way.
Avoiding Speculative Self-Talk

Unchecked self-talk can easily turn into self-delusion. The stories we create almost always make you look like the good guy and cannot be termed as objective.

  • The way to get out of this speculative self-delusion is to avoid any speculation about other people's anger, at least initially.
  • Make sure to note down the facts of the situation. This can make the story less according to your gut instinct, and more towards the objective reality.

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Stop And Breathe

Anxiety is typically experienced as worrying about a future or past event. But anxiety loses its grip when you clear your mind of worry and bring your awareness back to the present.

When a...

A Simple Breathing Technique
  • Sit in a comfortable position.
  • Close your eyes and inhale slowly through your nose.
  • Exhale deeply.
  • Continue to breathe deeply and fully. Allow your breath to be a guide to the present.
  • With each breath in, think to yourself “be” and with each breath out, focus on the word “present. ”
Figure Out What's Bothering You

The physical symptoms of panic and anxiety, such as trembling, chest pain, and rapid heartbeat, are more obvious than the reason you are anxious. But, to get to the root of your anxiety, you need to stop and think about your thoughts and feelings.

Writing all that bothers you or talking with a friend can help you understand your anxious feelings.

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